Frederic Sanchez

Miu Miu croisière 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Pal Zileri spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

MSGM men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Roberto Cavalli men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Prada men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

juil. 122018

Prada resort 2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

L’encyclopédie Florale de la Mode selon Vogue. Composition originale.

Business Of Fashion – 2 juillet 2018

The Seductive Conviction of Sonia Rykiel

Julie de Libran celebrated the brand’s 50th anniversary by glossing its essence with something grander.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Every so often, God smiles on fashion. On Sunday morning, Julie de Libran showed her L’Atelier collection for Sonia Rykiel in the courtyard of the Ecole des Beaux Arts. The weather complied. Frederic Sanchez chose the Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning” for the soundtrack, and the song’s strange, stinging sweetness was so perfect in context that you could feel critical faculties dissolving in the heat.

Which ultimately was neither here nor there, because de Libran mounted a fabulous display of classic Rykielisms, ticking box after box: sailor stripes, bias-cut jersey, pea coat, trench, mutant tuxedo, slinky lingerie and, always, the signature louche knitwear that defined a few generations of free-thinking Left Bankers. When the Chambre Syndicale, the governing body of French fashion, invited de Libran to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Rykiel brand, she was at first a little intimidated. Then she realized that what she was being offered was time, a real luxury in fashion. So she took it. She called the result L’Atelier because it was, after all, the expertise of the design studio that helped her gloss the brand’s essence with something a little grander.

So that’s what happened. Sonia launched her business in May 1968. Paris was in an activist uproar, and she rode that wave. It’s the nature of historical cycles that last century’s radical becomes this century’s pillar of society, but de Libran managed to expertly embody Rykiel’s transition. The multicoloured knit that dissolved into a chaos of threads would be ’68. The hyper-restraint of a floor-length tuxedo dress with coq-trimmed sleeves could, for the enfeebled purposes of my then and now comparison, stand for the kind of look that might entrance a modern client. But there was so much more: the slouch of a sequined sweatshirt, the scaled-up man’s suit, the classic Sonia sweater given some added SHAZAM! And the clichéd couture closer, the wedding dress, shown as a corseted extravagance over jeans.

De Libran was supported by a wonderful model casting: Kirsten Owen, Malgosia Bela, Elise Crombez, Aymeline Valade. Faces! The seductive conviction of the whole presentation made you wish the designer could reinvent this situation for her tepid ready-to-wear shows.

Business Of Fashion – 1 juillet 2018

Playing with the Double Side at Miu Miu

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday and the mysterious night.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Miuccia Prada had a significant cross-generational selection of actresses in the cruise collection she showed for Miumiu on Saturday, from Uma Thurman and Gwendoline Christie to Rowan Blanchard and Sadie Sink.

Then there were the models-turned actresses, Naomi Campbell, Jamie King, Audrey Marnay. Their presence made it clear the presentation was a performance. As it has been for the other fashion houses who’ve made a palaver out of cruise, everything distilled down to experience! Miumiu aimed for something immersive.

The setting was the Hotel Regina, an Art Nouveau gem adjacent to the Louvre. The story was essentially everything that goes on in hotels. Late nights, long corridors, lust cut loose from home and hearth. Cast your mind back to the video for Madonna’s “Justify My Love”. Or even “Lost in Translation”, with Bill Murray crooning “More than This” in a jet-lagged karaoke fog (both tracks were on Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack of “hotel music”).

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, the way people often are in hotels, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday, the mysterious night. Day featured sporty short shorts and cableknit cardigans, but also a galumphy teenbeat acid-washed denim element that was disconcerting enough to make you wonder if its presence was purely to emphasise the slinky adulthood of the rest of the collection, where columns of duchesse satin and swathes of leopard-patterned lamé. Much of it trimmed with feathers or generously strewn with crystals, conjured up Hollywood visions of stars lounging seductively in boudoirs, or slinking down hallways for assignations in other rooms. One enraptured onlooker was drawn to comparisons with Fellini’s “Juliet of the Spirits” and its rococo sensuality.

At the same time Miuccia couldn’t help herself. She had to undercut the obvious. So there were naïve jacquards – pussycats and flowers — and denim wrapped in a sheer peignoir that injected an element of sour/sweet, and a haunting undertow of « Rosemary’s Baby » in a model with Mia Farrow’s pixie cut from that film. (Or maybe it was Roman Polanski’s presence in the audience that sparked that association.)

Miuccia felt the duality was intrinsic. “In my life, I like to play with the double side,” she admitted. If, in the provocative anonymity of a huge old hotel, at least one facet of her split personality took on a racy life all its own, there was also the other grounded side of her personality to pose critical questions like What’s it all about? and Are we really having fun?

Fashion Network – 22 juin 2018

Ann Demeulemeester’s symbolist romance

By Godfrey Deeny

Nothing very gender specific in a notably romantic co-ed show by the house of Ann Demeulemeester, an nostalgic collection that captured the contemporary yearning for a little more poetry in our lives.

The clothes were almost interchangeable between the guys and the gals in this collection, very much in keeping with the poetic rocker DNA of this Belgian house.

The gents appeared in lace shirts and gloves; cut-off petticoats; ladylike woven leather sandals; girly white cotton blouses and bloomers; the ladies wearing similar gear. Half the cast sported battered leather and straw hats worthy of a peasant in a Van Gogh oil painting. Above all, some superbly cut linen planters coats and dusters in dusty pink jacquards and ecru. Plenty of good merchandise in other words; and all inspired by the late 19th century symbolist painter Odilon Redon, whose paintings phantasmagorical dream-like qualities were echoed in the clothes.

“Odilon came from moment a when people were beginning to doubt the need for constant progress. When people wanted to pause and dream more. That’s what I wanted to suggest,” said the house’s creative director Sébastien Meunier, who took over the design helm after founder Ann retired in 2013.

That need for dreams also apparent in an inspired soundtrack by Frederic Sanchez: four versions by, respectively, Marianne Faithful, Loreena McKennitt, Elizabeth Fraser and Joan Baez, of that great Irish romantic lament, She Moved Through the Fair. A moment of grace among an intensely busy day of traffic jams, multiple events and parties.

Fashion Network – 17 juin 2018

Prada ou la nouvelle élégance décontractée

Par Godfrey Deeny  –  17 juin 2018

A la manière des équipes qui se révèlent toujours brillantes en compétition, Miuccia Prada est de la trempe des créateurs compétiteurs, ces designers qui sortent les meilleures idées à chaque saison, qui savent avec précision à quel moment changer de direction ou quand un concept artistique ou stratégique a fait son temps.

Au moment précis où tout le monde à Milan se résigne à suivre le courant en injectant des coupes, des finitions et des matériaux inspirés du sportswear tout en les associant avec des motifs et couleurs tirés de l’univers du skateboard, Miuccia Prada met le holà. Et décide, pour le printemps-été 2019, de présenter une silhouette décontractée, vaguement technique, à la coupe impeccable – une allure qui allait très, très bien à ses mannequins particulièrement juvéniles et ébouriffés.
  
« Je déteste le fait que les Millennials soient réduits à une simple catégorie marketing. Ils sont notre jeunesse, la prochaine génération. Les voir comme une proposition commerciale, c’est stupide », explique la créatrice italienne devant un buffet parsemé de vodka-citron et de sandwiches aux anchois juste après le défilé.

Des pantalons à la coupe élancée, sans pinces ; des manteaux et des blazers minimalistes, en veau velours, et du denim légèrement délavé du meilleur effet – d’ailleurs, notez-le bien : le denim clair, utilisé sur des pièces tailleur, est à nouveau officiellement autorisé. Également très réussie, une série de sneakers en toile élastique. Rien de trop appuyé : branché et actuel, mais mûrement réfléchi. La plupart des mannequins portaient des chapkas en nylon matelassé, tantôt couleur tabac, noir, rose, puis imprimé d’incroyables motifs.
 
« Je suis à la recherche d’une nouvelle élégance. Je la ressens chez la nouvelle génération. Les jeunes en ont assez du street style, des logos et du skateboard. Ce sont leurs parents qui ont lancé cette tendance ! » rappelle Miuccia Prada.

Elle n’a pas oublié d’ajouter un soupçon psychédélique : des mélanges de motifs surréalistes, avec des visages de jeunes filles sensuelles aux lèvres écarlates ; des parterres entiers de fleurs ; des cimes de montagnes acidulées et des gratte-ciel au parfum vintage. Ambiance Jimi Hendrix du 21e siècle, des tenues parfaites pour aller faire la fête.
 
Cette saison, Miuccia Prada a renoué avec la tradition, en présentant son défilé à la Fondazione Prada. Et, avec son équipe de compétition, elle a créé un nouveau décor magnifique : de confortables sièges gonflables en plastique transparent réalisés à partir d’un design original de Verner Panton qui n’avait jamais vu le jour.

Au rythme d’une bande-son géniale assemblée par Frédéric Sanchez, qui s’ouvrait sur le titre « Windowlicker » d’Aphex Twin, les mannequins jeunes, frais et plein d’assurance, défilaient dans une ambiance calme et mise en scène avec intelligence.

Bizarrement, au même moment, la meilleure équipe de tournoi du monde – l’Allemagne – a perdu son premier match à la Coupe du monde, face au Mexique… Personne n’est parfait.
Par Godfrey Deeny
Traduit par Paul Kaplan

juin 192018

Vogue – 17 juin 2018

by LUKE LEITCH

A Prada show sometimes feels like an especially fiendish crossword puzzle that’s designed never to be solved. To get to something even approaching a suitable answer you need to navigate a whole tranche of clues, misdirections, and visual entendres.

But that’s the game. The unknowability of Prada is one of the elements that so entrances its devotees. As Timothy Leary once said, “The universe is an intelligence test.” In Miuccia Prada’s universe, the test is to find the intelligence—the information—that leads you to a vaguely acceptable explanation.

Tonight the trail of clues began with the setup. Prada’s double-vaulted industrial shell was stripped back and redolent with the fresh-rubber smell of a newly bought pool toy, thanks to the translucent sheeting that coated its walls and floor. The seating was reproductions of the inflatable footstool first produced in 1960 by Danish designer Verner Panton, whose “total environment” interiors look like Austin Powers sets today, but were in their time powerfully psychedelic spaces.

This nod to the 1960s (sex, drugs, rock ’n’ roll!) prefaced the most urgent-to-the-eye decorations in this show: the powerfully ’60s florals near the end, the hand-drawn head-scape of flowers, clouds, and girls on a sweater towards the beginning, and the three printed and filtered collage looks—with short-shorts—in the middle. The music was Aphex Twin and Brian Eno, culminating with Air’s “Sexy Boy.” Okay . . . so was this Prada taking a trip to Sexytown? Backstage Mrs. Prada said she was hoping this season’s iteration of Prada man would be “elegant but in a young, new way.” Almost coyly, she did not disagree with the suggestion that sexiness was on the Prada palette. “You know I’m a bit contrarian. You know I never pronounce this word in my life: I never wanted to pronounce the word sexy. But now, sexy. . . .”

Aha! Maybe that was it! Prada loves to play with the ugly, and today—as Versace touched on, too—sexy is an ugly notion. Which makes it ripe for Prada-fication. So was Prada dosing us, taking us on a trip and urging us to turn on, tune in, drop out, and assess the subject afresh?

Sexiness is subjective, of course, but there was a trad-masculine authority (if that’s what you’re into) in the cleanly cut single-vented colored blazers and seamed, washed jeans with a break. There was also plenty of thigh (if that’s what you’re into) in the Daisy Duke denims (Davey Dukes?) and printed, striped, or plain short shorts which Prada might just have described as “miniskirts for men” (it was hard to hear in the backstage crush). There was a touch of femme (if that’s what you’re into) in the rubber-sheened ruffle-fronted shirts that were delivered towards the end.

There was a gentle return to the logo-fication we’ve seen here in recent seasons, but with none of the heavy emphasis on sportswear. Instead there were sturdily unreconstructed rib-knit and leather half-zips, boat shoes, ushankas in house nylon or a weave in red and blue that translated to sneakers and a sweater, and a tailored silhouette that was ostentatiously un-emphasized. Every look—every single one of them—came with a bag slung across the right shoulder.

Prada collections are drawn-out acts of fashion titillation, obfuscation, and veiled intent. As propositions go, tonight’s was almost bracingly direct: sexy boys in elusive clothes. And, like, wearable.

Business Of Fashion – 17 juin 2018

A New Elegance at Prada

Miuccia Prada built her collection on blazers and coats and then frosted the familiar with a layer of excitement — including a psychedelic subtext, a bit of flower power and a sensational mélange of found imagery.

BY TIM BLANKS

MILAN, Italy — After her show on Sunday night, Miuccia Prada insisted she prefers the most basic, banal words to describe what she does. No fancy-schmancy intellectualising. Just words like “simple” or “sexy” or “raw. » The Prada twist is, of course, that nothing is ever really simple.

For Miuccia’s dream of “normal that looks exciting” to come true, you have to have normal to begin with. Maybe that’s why she built her new collection on blazers and coats, classic in camel and grey flannel, less so in suede and chambray. Then she was able to frost the familiar with a layer of what could pass for excitement. It was most obvious in a psychedelic subtext, a bit of flower power, a sensational mélange of found imagery on Paul Hameline’s turtleneck (rumour had it that Miuccia herself had mixed up this psych stew).

But there were also frisson-ish echoes of the “ugly” prints that made Prada’s name a few decades ago, the same ones Miuccia resuscitated in the cruise collection she presented in New York in May. And she said she imagined the belted and buckled short shorts that ruled the show as the male equivalents of May’s miniskirts, though they were also ultimate twink attire, stirring up long-buried memories of a prelapsarian era in gay porn.

So there was actually SEX in the show. Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack played Air’s “Sexy Boy” as the models made their final march. It illuminated the curious challenge in this strange brew. Miuccia claimed that she was ultimately after “a new elegance”, something that honoured sport and street (so many grabby, sporty bits and pieces in the collection, anchored by fabulous footwear) while also transcending them.

Reflect on the way she’s covered menswear in the past and you’ll get a pretty clear idea of how she feels about the male of the species. She does like to deball him, emphasise the vulnerability rather than the masculinity. And why on earth not? Toxic testosterone is paving the ghastly cul-de-sac into which human civilisation is veering. So Miuccia’s response — not for the first time — was to play up a man’s feminine side: a ruffle, a purse, and always those « sexy » shorts.

It was also tantalising to imagine the huge trapper hats that accessorised almost every look as some sly acknowledgement of the creeping Putin effect on the West. Miuccia’s political sensibility was, after all, shaped in the crucible of Communist activism in 1970’s Milan. Unfortunately for that theory, those hats had already dressed up the New York show, where they were inspired by an image of a Galliano look once sported by Kate Moss. In this latest incarnation, Miuccia said she liked the impression the trapper hat created of a huge head tottering on a skinny male body. (OK, that’s vulnerable-ish.)

And so to the set: raw concrete walls draped in sheets of translucent plastic, seating made up of inflatable plastic cubes, originally designed by Verner Panton in the early 1960s but only now produced for sale. An intangible environment, scarcely helped by the geographic coordinates printed on the floor. Apparently, they were for “remote places. » We were not to know where we were. And I’m not sure that Miuccia knew either.

Business Of Fashion – 17 juin 2018

Marni Presents a Surreal Sporting Exhibition

Francesco Risso exhumed vintage uniforms and twisted them into new guises. But the show’s presentation pointed to layers deeper and darker than catwalk hijinks.

BY TIM BLANKS

MILAN, Italy — Francesco Risso likes to challenge his audience with the seating arrangements for his Marni shows. On Saturday afternoon, the chosen few hundred perched uncertainly on Swiss exercise balls. All in keeping with Risso’s theme: L’Olympiade Imaginaria, a surreal sporting competition in which imperfection was allowed and everyone – plump, skinny, old, young – was welcome. “We’re used to the narcissistic pursuit of the perfect body,” Risso explained, “but it’s most important to bring tenderness. That’s more powerful than strength.”

We’re quite familiar by now with the way in which sportswear has transformed men’s fashion, injecting a casual physicality into rule-bound tradition. Risso doubled down, stepped back in time, exhumed vintage uniforms for cricket, tennis, baseball, golf, minced and twisted them and fired them back in new guises. Imagine ballers in big caps and plus fours, like the Duke of Windsor joined a street gang. Or players in boiled mohair two-pieces striped in lilac and pistachio. Team sports in Alice’s Wonderland.

The sportiness was indisputable, from terry robes that were ringside-ready, to swathes of racing stripes and checks, to the big, bifurcated puffas and the doubled t’s and sweats that will likely be the pieces that dress fashion editorials. But in the show setting – a rundown carpark underneath the Torre Velasca, one of Milan’s very first skyscrapers – it was more interesting to chase Risso’s rationale down the rabbit hole. “A ping-pong Olympics in Andy Warhol’s Factory,” he rhapsodised. “Innocence with a bit of corruption.”

There were photoprints of male body parts – homoerotic, I guess – by Berlin-based artist Florian Herz, followed by Matisse-naïve graphics borrowed from the painter Betsy Podlach, their contributions pointing to layers deeper and darker than the catwalk hijinks. Frédéric Sanchez’s soundtrack – John Foxx intoning “I Want to be a Machine” – compounded that impression. And don’t get me started on the invitation. Was it a gingerbread man made from bubblegum? It melted in the car.

mai 172018

Prada Bags Pre Fall 2018. Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Document Magazine – 9 mai 2018

How Prada’s music producer Frédéric Sanchez landed on 90s classics for their 2019 Resort show

Text by
Megan Wray Schertler

How Prada’s music producer Frédéric Sanchez landed on 90s classics for their 2019 Resort show
Prada Resort 2019 Show at Piano Factory, NYC. Photograph by Griffin Lipson/BFA.com. Copyright BFA.
The music producer crafted a show soundtrack inspired by timelessness and Daft Punk for Prada’s 2019 Resort show.

As one of the biggest show music producers in fashion, Frédéric Sanchez has created show music pieces for the biggest names in the fashion industry since his first live show gig for Maison Martin Margiela show in 1988. Ahead of the first Prada’s 2019 Cruise show in New York—its first in the city after a 20-year absence—Miuccia Prada tapped Sanchez, a long-time collaborator with the designer to provide a soundscape for the show that was unquestionably 90s—think lots of Daft Punk and R.E.M. Document spoke with Sanchez backstage at the designer’s headquarters, a former piano factory on West 52nd Street, following the show’s noisy melange of technical fabrics, loud prints, and graphic logos placed front and center.

Document—How did you land on this particular musical direction for the show?

Frederic—When Mrs. Prada and I started talking about the collection, we were feeling nostalgic for certain things that we did in the 90s. There was also a hint of the psychedelic. This season the word we kept returning to was “timeless” and the idea of being without any references, which is kind of completely the opposite of what I was saying five minutes ago. That’s why we used a few pieces of music that felt very iconic from that time, like the first record from the French band Daft Punk that came out around that time. We both said, “This is so iconic that it does not feel old.”

Document—What was the specific mix?

Frederic—I used two specific songs from that record [1997’s Homework], but I kept only the rhythm, and we remixed in a way that makes it even more contemporary. Then, we had three songs mixed with this a track from the film Donnie Darko, Gary Jules’s ‘Mad World’, and then the song ‘Wake Up’ from a band called Mad Season. It’s two musicians, one from a band called Alice in Chains from the grunge era, and another one from Pearl Jam. Then, we used an R.E.M. song.

“I think it’s very difficult to look at what is happening in the current moment because there’s so too much of everything. I think the only way to create something that resonates is to go deeply into yourself.”

Document—What was the R.E.M. song that you used?

Frederic—The R.E.M. song is The One I Love. It’s from an unplugged record.

Document—A total classic.

Frederic—Yes! So very classic songs and very romantic in a way. The obvious thing would have been to use the electronic sounds from Daft Punk to open the show, but we used the song from Donnie Darko, which is a very, very romantic thing. Then, suddenly, you have that clash with the very strong electronic beat coming in. So, it’s really these two things that are clashing through the whole show.

Document—It’s impossible to tell whether something will stand the test time without substantial distance. R.E.M. is a really great example of that. I feel like they hit the peak of their pop-stardom in the 90s then kind of fell out of favor as the decade came to a close. But, I think a lot of their music sounds really fresh now when you revisit it.

Frederic—Yes, yes. And also because the personality of the person that made them, you know? When you think about Michael Stipe or Kurt Cobain, they have become icons. Icons don’t die. [Laughs]

Document—I think they start to mean different things to different generations.

Frederic—I think it’s very difficult to look at what is happening in the current moment because there’s so too much of everything. I think the only way to create something that resonates is to go deeply into yourself.

Document—To let intuition guide you.

Frederic—Exactly, yes. It makes it personal and sensitive.

Document—Mrs. Prada must be a fantastic person to collaborate with in that case. I feel like intuition is very much a tool she uses to navigate each season.

Frederic—Completely. It’s fantastic because she pushes you to go deeply into what you want to create and what you think.

Document—How early do you start working on the soundtracks for the shows?

Frederic—I work for Prada all year long, so I am researching all the time for them, but I called them maybe two weeks ago to discuss music for this show. The process really starts the moment when they put the clothes together and do the fittings, so like a week before the show. I arrived in New York on the Monday before the show and was there everyday. When making the soundtrack for the live event, I always like to use existing music because it’s almost like the effect of perfume. I can transfer emotion through references. There’s a sort of romanticism and poetry to the songs. The rhythm tells you something about modern things, architecture—the modern world as we know it.

Business Of Fashion – 7 mai 2018

Miuccia Prada’s Mad World

For Prada’s first cruise show in New York, its filter was turned up to the max. The designer proposed new silhouettes and details that moved far away from today’s overwrought trends, providing an urgent, necessary relief from tired fashion.

BY LAUREN SHERMAN

NEW YORK, United States — Years ago, Prada bought an old piano factory here in Manhattan, far, far in the West 1950s. It was a dead zone back then. Now, the neighbourhood is filling up with luxury apartment buildings and vaguely chic restaurants, populated with New Yorkers thrilled to have escaped cramped quarters in denser parts of the city.

Prada, too, has settled in to what it is now its US corporate headquarters, with enough room to accommodate a runway: an entire empty, brutal, concrete floor. On Friday evening, the architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron lined the windows of the space, where Miuccia Prada showed her Cruise 2019 collection, with red plexiglass, offering a new lens on those west side views. New York through the Prada filter. This is only the second time the house has made the resort season an event — the first was last year at home in Milan — and the choice to show here was a statement, albeit a quieter one than many destination shows. It was about the significance of the US to its commercial business, which it says is picking up after years of lag, but also to its identity.

The show’s soundtrack opened with Michael Andrews and Gary Jules’ wrenching cover of “Mad World.” With a song as dark as that, the models instantly felt like real, actual teenagers, wearing narrow slip dresses and ruffle-edged minis. After the show, Prada described the collection as “contemporary,” although much of its relevance came from referencing her own work from the 1990s. She also roped in other ideas from the era: In particular, the iconic photograph of Kate Moss in a Jean Paul Gaultier fur trapper hat taken by Steven Klein for Harper’s Bazaar.

“It’s my vision of what’s real and what you want to wear today,” she said. “But it’s always a fantasy.”

Perhaps that’s why she said she can’t resist returning time and again to her famous upholstery florals and geometric patterns in saturated hues so specific to her palette. And with good reason: few designers’ archives transcend eras so successfully. But this wasn’t a nostalgic collection. Instead, Prada proposed ideas that will, thankfully, move the fashion conversation forward: a belt slung low, skirts that falls far above the knee, spaghetti-strap tanks, an empire waist. Certain details — a mullet ruffle on a pair of elongated floral brocade trousers, an engineered knit fuzzy like static on an old television, a reinterpretation of the logo fit for the cover of a graphic novel — were tiny but impactful. What a relief to know something new is coming.

But Prada has never lacked relevance on the runway. The staggering number of thinking-person celebrities — including Ava Duvernay, Lena Waithe, Sarah Paulson and David O. Russell, as well as designer fanboys Raf Simons and Marc Jacobs — sitting front row indicates that her work holds important place in the broader culture. They wanted to be there. Will company itself finally be able to take that good will, that admiration, that adoration, and sell in a way that is as contemporary as the work? There’s certainly plenty of material.

Archétypes, Artefacts et Simulacres – Novembre 2017. Installation. Holiday Boileau. Filmé par Matthieu Salvaing.

Moncler Genius Présentation fall winter 2018 – 19. Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Carven women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Roberto Cavalli women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Anna Sui women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Ann Demeulemeester women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Comme des Garçons women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Hermès women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Jil Sander women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Marine Serre women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Marni women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Miu Miu fall winter 2018-19

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Nina Ricci fall winter 2018-19

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Prada men’s and women’s fall winter 2018-19

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Sonia Rykiel fall winter 2018-19

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – Pierpaolo Piccioli

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – Moncler 1952

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – Grenoble by Sandro Mandrino

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – Simone Rocha

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – Craig Green

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Moncler Genius Presentation fall winter 2018-19 – General area & Guests entrance

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ERDEM fall winter 2018-19

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Mary Katrantzou fall winter 2018-19

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Comme des Garçons Homme Plus fall winter 2018-19

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Dior Homme fall winter 2018-19

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Ann Demeulemeester men’s fall winter 2018-19

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Marni men’s fall winter 2018-19

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MSGM men’s fall winter 2018-19

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Prada men’s fall winter 2018-19

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Craig Green fall winter 2018-19

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Miu Miu fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

Le Monde – 7 mars 2018

Paris Fashion Week, c’est fini !

En clôture de la fashion week parisienne, trois grandes maisons, Chanel, Miu Miu et Louis Vuitton, ont tonifié une saison de défilés un peu terne.

Le marathon des fashion weeks vient de prendre fin à Paris, dernière étape d’une saison qui ressemble davantage à un moment de transition qu’à un grand cru. Mardi 6 mars, pour la dernière journée, trois des plus grands noms de l’industrie se sont partagé la conclusion de débats vestimentaires. Ceux-ci ont beaucoup tourné autour de la féminité, du féminisme et du droit des femmes. Ces trois shows sont les trois derniers points de vue sur le sujet de la saison.

Chanel.
Chez Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld fait peu de discours. Sa collection parle pour lui, célèbre un raffinement moderne, une idée de la féminité sophistiquée et libre dans un décor atmosphérique qui rappelle un roman d’Ivan Tourgueniev. L’odeur des feuilles mortes accueille les invités dans une forêt légèrement brumeuse où ne manquent que les croassements des corneilles. Les longs manteaux droits en tweed aux épaules ajustées, les vestes à la taille appuyée et à basques qui se terminent en pointes, les cols montants « à la Karl » (le couturier porte les mêmes), les grands pantalons en cuir matelassé sous des vestes amples à quatre poches signent une allure souple, confortable et fidèle aux codes Chanel.

Du manteau à capuche et imprimé feuilles aux longues jupes or éteint, tout est enveloppant mais sans lourdeur. Les effets de volume, millionième variation sur les lignes des tailleurs Chanel traditionnels, sont particulièrement réussis et servent d’ossature à toute la collection. Longue jupe corolle, maxi-veste trapèze, petites épaules légèrement aiguës, tout est millimétré sans jamais être contraignant. Ces femmes qui avancent d’un bon pas dans ce bois clair incarnent une vision positive et décidée de la féminité. Leur vestiaire très luxe et facile à porter est un vecteur de liberté d’expression subtile et pas un exercice de mode qui les contraindrait à rentrer dans un moule.

Miu Miu.
Miuccia Prada a formé chez Miu Miu un club de « bad girls » réjouissantes. Entre les murs du Conseil économique et social, l’austérité architecturale est contrebalancée par de grands panneaux suspendus comme des fanions, imprimés de dessins mi-lettrines mi-portraits de femmes. Celles qui arrivent sur le podium sur une bande-son rock parfaitement calibrée par Frédéric Sanchez évoquent à la fois la vamp rockabilly Wanda Woodward du film Cry-Baby et les princesses punk rock à la Poison Ivy, la guitariste des Cramps. Ajoutez un peu d’Amy Winehouse et de style années 1980, et c’est parti pour une parade de filles piquantes mais sympathiques en chaussettes mohair et talons vernis.

Des pantalons et blousons en jean neige aux imperméables froncés de cuir de couleur en passant par les tweeds « sixties » et les robes à fleurs près du corps, tout est porté par des mannequins aux cheveux crêpés et aux silhouettes globalement plus pulpeuses que la moyenne des podiums. On a retrouvé la femme Miu Miu fraîche et fun, nourrie de culture pop, qui avait disparu la saison dernière.

Louis Vuitton.
Louis Vuitton présentait sa collection dans la cour Lefuel du Louvre, habituellement inaccessible au public et recouverte pour l’occasion d’un sol façon vaisseau spatial. Le lieu a certes du cachet, mais présente aussi des inconvénients : il est très exigu, les trop nombreux invités ont du mal à trouver leur place, surtout que le parterre de célébrités (Michelle Williams, Noomi Rapace, etc.) en prend beaucoup.

La collection, elle, marque un retour de Nicolas Ghesquière à des formes plus simples, un glissement stylistique vers une silhouette de néobourgeoise qui pourrait beaucoup plaire à Brigitte Macron, très souvent habillée par le designer. Ses vestes brodées de métallerie or, ses gilets bicolores boutonnés sur une robe et ses effets monochromes évoquent un classicisme auquel on n’était guère habitué. Les blouses façon sweat-shirts en patchworks de matières et les hauts corsetés qui mêlent motifs sixties et soie argent renvoient aux goûts plus expérimentaux du créateur, ceux qui l’ont fait connaître quand il officiait chez Balenciaga. La prochaine saison en dira plus sur cette nouvelle femme Vuitton.

Jil Sander women’s fall winter 2018 – 19 fashion show. Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Sonia Rykiel Paris fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

Hermès Women’s fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

M le magazine du Monde – Mars 2018

Carven Women’s fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

Roberto Cavalli Women’s fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

Missoni Women’s fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

Prada Women’s fall winter 2018-2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

Business Of Fashion – 4 mars 2018

Comme des Garçons’ Celebration of Artificiality

Rei Kawakubo sticks her finger in the wind and nails the moment, demonstrating the enduring outsider status of camp.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Something felt very different at the Comme des Garçons show on Saturday.​ ​Before we’d even slipped through the red curtains that swathed the entrance, Adrian Joffe, Rei Kawakubo’s husband, had said the key word of the new collection was CAMP. As in the joyous celebration of artificiality that Susan Sontag nailed in her sensational 1964 essay “Notes on ‘Camp’”. Joffe added that Kawakubo wanted a theatre as the venue for her new show. Curtains, too. Inside, there was more red velvet, with two huge theatrical klieg lights suspended above the catwalk.

So that was before the show. Afterwards, Kawakubo greeted guests with a warm handshake and a “Thank you for coming.” No longer the inscrutable sphinx. Instead, she said, “I wanted people to be happy.” They were. Deliriously so.

What happened in between was one of those intermittently prescient situations where Rei Kawakubo sticks her finger in the wind and nails the moment. Going back to Sontag for an instant, she wrote in 1964, “Camp is the consistently aesthetic experience of the world. It incarnates the victory of ‘style’ over ‘content’, ‘aesthetics’ over ‘morality’, of irony over tragedy.” What Kawakubo extracted from Sontag’s words was a feeling that camp could embody an enduringly rebellious spirit, in defiance of hidebound orthodoxy. So her collection was exactly the joyous celebration of artificiality that Sontag wrote of.

The music was Nino Rota’s soundtrack for Federico Fellini’s film La Strada, detailing the tragic travails of a travelling circus. Then it was the operatic drama of Profokiev’s Romeo and Juliet. Emotional, big, in other words. And the bigness carried over into the clothes: massed petticoats, polka-dotted lumps and bumps, rolls of fabric making huge rosettes, a glittering red showgirl outfit dissected and mounted like a trophy on a red tulle foundation, a big fairytale STAR, and a huge mille-feuille of fabric which brought to mind the fairytale of the princess and the pea. Articulated pieces moved like tectonic plates as the models walked. Theatrical sumptuousness prevailed.

At the end of the show, the models held hands as they lined up along the stage, like a cast taking a bow while the audience clapped themselves senseless. That reaction vindicated Kawakubo in her conviction that Sontag was right about camp. If, as Rei believes, the original rebel yell of punk has lost its guts, camp prevails with its enduring outsider status. “It can express something deeper and can give birth to progress,” she said. Maybe that’s what we were looking at. There is no doubt that a spirit of aesthetic excess seems like an inspirational response to the dark, goatish machinations of male power-mongers.

Vogue UK – 1er Mars 2018

Carven women’s fall winter 2018 19

by ANDERS CHRISTIAN MADSEN

You could recap the Carven show in its soundtrack. Mixed by Frédéric Sanchez, whose love of a mainstream pop song in a fashion show can be a rare gift on day 23 of the gruelling show season, it had all the louche beats of a high-fashion score. But here and there, almost like she was bursting through a barrier, Rihanna’s voice came through loud and clear, in “Love the Way You Lie”. At Carven, Serge Ruffieux, who came from the hallowed haute couture halls of Christian Dior, is posed with the challenge of bringing those values to a mid-market customer. In his sophomore collection, much like that soundtrack, he created a silhouette that borrowed from artisanal codes but constructed it in humble materials. “When I start a collection I always start on the body. I try to find a new proportion; a new silhouette,” he said. “It’s grounded, versatile, uplifting. Versatile, because it’s important to me to mix raw fabrics with something refined.”

It was expressed most palpably in garments hybridising two familiar pieces, like a jacket half quilted and half plaid, structured to kick out at the back in a couture-like gesture. Or how about a mid-market tweed suit so sculpted it looked like it had been statuesquely cast on the body? This is a designer, who knows what he’s doing. Ruffieux understands the social media era’s peculiar balance between mainstream commerciality and the desire for one-of-a-kind things that bear the touch of a real human hand. It’s reflected in the limited edition streetwear kids queue up for outside cult brand stores, in personalised phone covers, or the countless videos from haute couture shows that make the rounds online. Beautifully made fashion is no longer the privilege of the few, and in his interpretation of an accessible and attainable brand like Carven, Ruffieux captures that mentality pretty effortlessly. “The message is real clothes for real women,” he said. “That’s very important to me.”

Business Of Fashion – 26 février 2018

Marni

A Plurality of Women at Marni

There is a fundamental naiveté in Francesco Risso’s approach, as well as an effort to impose order on chaos, like a kid making sense of the world.

BY TIM BLANKS

MILAN, Italy — “Elementary, my dear Watson,” said Sherlock Holmes as he unpicked a web of clues to solve another case. Francesco Risso loved the notion of building a collection the same way: clues, codes, signs, a solution. And, like Sherlock, he also described the process as elementary.

But that is the fundamental naiveté of Risso’s approach to Marni. On the one hand, there were the raw hems, the dangling threads and primitive top-stitching, the exaggerated proportions, the flagrant colour scheme (“women screaming with colour,” he said). Elementary. On the other, there was the effort to impose order on chaos, like a kid making sense of the world. We sat on tightly wrapped bales of bedding and clothes. “After the men’s show, I liked the idea of controlling the waste of stuff,” said Risso. Instead of the fur that Marni’s business was founded on, there was an impressive topcoat cut from the felt blankets removal men use for packing. Recycling, connecting with the natural world…he liked that idea too. “Nature brings us into primitivism,” he added. His models wore peacock feathers trailing dramatically from their ears.

It was the second time this week that Victor Frankenstein — the literary inspiration for anyone engaged in the act of roughly stitching new life together – reared his head. Alessandro Michele is engaged on a similar project at Gucci. Risso talked about a “Siamese union, » as in twins conjoined. The essence of the collection was that half-and-half: a coat that was half green python, half black leather, another that was industrial felting and hot pink wool. There were schizophrenic dresses that felt sophisticated on this side, turned inside out to lining on that. In one of those naïve leaps of inspiration that seem to be characteristic of Risso, he extended the idea of the Siamese into a whiskery cat motif for coats and jackets. Soundtrackist Frederic Sanchez complemented it with a recording of opera singers’ warm-up exercises. They apparently “miaow” over and over again. Weird and wonderful.

« If this was a movie, it would be called ‘The I, the We, The Army of Me,' » said Risso. We rocked back on our heels and thought about that for a moment. Fortunately, there were shownotes to clarify. “The individual and the collective. Being one and safety in numbers. A plurality of women…”

There was joy and fun in Risso’s Marni, but there was a message too.

Business Of Fashion- 25 février 2018

Jil Sander

Quiet Optimism at Jil Sander

By Tim Blanks

In their second show for Jil Sander, Lucie and Luke Meier projected this season’s running themes of protection and safety into the future, to a life beyond all this chaos.

MILAN, Italy — Running themes throughout this season have been protection and safety, logical responses to the climate of crisis that is wracking the present. But, in their second show for Jil Sander, Lucie and Luke Meier projected those ideas into the future, to a life beyond all this chaos. Or at least a future as it was imagined by the past, particularly in the sci-fi classic “2001: A Space Odyssey,” where a spiritual rebirth was achieved by transcendence over technology. Luke admitted to a nostalgia for that future. “It’s possible again,” he said optimistically.

So maybe the serene beauty of the collection could be construed as quiet optimism. The models were cocooned in monochrome, white, black, grey, but also head-to-toe cerulean, tomato and celadon. Some of them carried baby duvets. Others were swaddled in them. Softness reigned supreme. “The fabrics cocoon on their own,” said Luke. Even a corset detail came in felt, softening the idea of restriction.

The other decorative element was a wallpaper-y print which, woven in purple lurex, had a rococo edge. I thought of the room where the astronaut David Bowman ends up in “2001,” surrounded by relics of human civilisation. That may sound like an Ingrid-it’s-only-a-movie stretch, but it wasn’t so far off what the Meiers were thinking too. As much as there was a spirit of optimism, there was inevitably the melancholy that attaches itself to nostalgia. You scarcely needed Leonard Cohen croaking “Bird on a Wire” on the soundtrack to remind you of that. Equally melancholic: the square of white plastic that accompanied the invitation. As a reminder of environmental crisis, it unwittingly amplified the point the Meiers were making about the need for a new consciousness.

Sidebar: like Missoni earlier in the day, the Jil Sander show was maximally enhanced by showing the men’s and women’s collections together. Compatibility to the power of 2!

févr. 262018

Business Of Fashion- 24 février 2018

Prada On the Edge

Miuccia Prada showed a collection founded on oppositions, extreme power and extreme femininity — where sweetness read as a disguise, a distraction and a dare.

BY TIM BLANKS

MILAN, Italy — The exhibition that currently takes up most of the space at the Fondazione Prada covers the years when Mussolini was in power in Italy. It has an aching timeliness with its detailing of the impact that an autocratic popinjay can have on popular culture. “My thoughts are influencing the Fondazione,” Miuccia Prada declared after her show on Thursday night. It made sense to assume some connection between what she is showing in her galleries, and what she showed on her catwalk.

It was a sensational idea, if not particularly elevating. What it makes clear is how much creativity suffered under Fascism. “When things are getting bad, even art disappears,” Miuccia acknowledged. “And what worries me for the art, worries me for the fashion.” But that has sparked a quiet fury in her. “We have to be ready to identify and respond,” she added. So what she showed were clothes for women who were ready to resist. It made for a collection founded on oppositions: extreme power and extreme femininity. Paillettes, tulle petticoats and bows in the same outfit as padded tech pieces. “My excuse for the show was the freedom of a woman in the night, super-sexy without being bothered.” I believe I heard Miuccia say that. “How to be powerful and still be feminine.”

Laudable. It reminded me of “A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, » a movie a whole lot more people should see, if only because it couches the #TimesUp debate — and its partner #MeToo — in such primal, incontrovertible terms. “#MeToo? I think about it since so many years,” said Miuccia. “It’s time to really make it happen.”

Maybe this collection was her contribution to facilitation. There was a lot of sweet prom dress girliness balanced on ankle socks and heels — there was even a manga flapper, sheathed in electric filaments — but it was matched to bulky tweeds and sporty nylons, hyper-protective. There was even a variation of the sanitation worker that Raf Simons offered at Calvin Klein. Defensive, vaguely apocalyptic. In that context, the sweetness, in embroidered tulle veils, read as a disguise, a distraction, a dare. You hardly needed Bill Murray and Wes Anderson in the front row to underline the depth of irony in such a notion. And the discombobulating layering of Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack — Blondie, Bryan Ferry, Tom Waits — only added to the dislocated mood.

The show took place in the top floors of a recently completed tower in the Fondazione Prada compound. In the arid industrial space below were mounted neons of Prada iconography: The bananas! The monkey! It’s the art of Prada to make you feel on the edge of something. She did it again.

Vogue UK – 22 février 2018

11 Epic Prada Sets We Loved

by ELISA CARASSAI

MILAN Fashion Week rolls round again, and anticipation is mounting for the Prada show. But it’s not just about the clothes – we’re just as eager to see the sets. A long-standing collaborator with Rem Koolhaas’ design studio, AMO (it also designed Fondazione Prada in Milan), Miuccia Prada has, since 2007, been welcoming her guests with scenographic theatres of all types at Prada HQ on Via Fogazzaro, minus a couple of exceptions. Her most recent pre-fall show, for instance, was held in the warehouse that holds pending artworks for Fondazione Prada, causing fashion insiders to speculate on this season’s location. Here, we relive 11 spectacular sets that still pack a visual punch.

Autumn/winter 2013 menswear: « The Ideal House »
This was the season that AMO studio collaborated with American-German company Knoll on a series of design objects for the ‘ideal home’, with an interior populated with geometric furniture, objects and manifestations of everyday life, with screens that featured interior and exterior views onto a cityscape.

Spring/summer 2014 menswear: « Menacing Paradise »
Conceived by AMO studio as an abstract representation of a small town, the spring menswear set was lined with murals of tropical palm trees, sunsets, helicopters and « menacing » shapes. Helicopters whirled on the soundtrack to add to the threatening mood.

Spring/summer 2014: « In the Heart of the Multitude »
Artists came together to collaborate with Prada on a series of murals and illustrations that mused on themes of femininity, representation, power and multiplicity. Inspired by the politically-charged murals of Diego Rivera, muralists including Gabriel Specter and Stinkfish and illustrators Jeanne Detallante and Pierre Mornet saw their work almost enveloping the audience – and making its way onto clothes. The main surprise? Britney Spears was on the soundtrack.

Spring/summer 2015: « Outdoor / Indoor / Outdoor, 2″
For the previous menswear show, AMO had transformed the show space into a swimming pool. They reversed the impulse for the womenswear show, erecting purple dunes which were a stunning and unexpected backdrop, with models pacing through the desert on a brown carpet that lined the edges of the set.

Autumn/winter 2015: « The Infinite Palace »
Blue and black « fake » marble lined the walls of the men’s show, which sported metal ceilings and metal floors; Frédéric Sanchez put Front 242 on the soundtrack.

Autumn/winter 2015 womenswear: « The Infinite Palace »
A Wes Anderson-like palette of pale greens and sugary pinks covered the walls of the womenswear show space, punctuated by aluminium inserts on doors and floors to create a hyper-intimate environment. « Sweet… » said Miuccia Prada, of the sugar-spun saturation of colour on the clothes and the set, « but violent. I wanted impact. How can you be strong with pastels? »

Spring/summer 2016: « Indefinite Hangar »
Billed as an investigation of « the perception of continuous space through an invasion of the ceiling », the spring set featured fibreglass and polycarbonate « stalactites » hanging from the ceiling, illuminated by an orange glow.

Spring/summer 2017: « Total Space »
This was the show where AMO Studio built a mesh ramp on the remnants of the previous season’s set. Defined as « layers of different architectures », the ramp was illuminated by lights, and was conceived by American director David O. Russell as a surreal dreamscape, and featured a preview of his collaborative short film with Prada, Past Forward.

Resort 2018: « Suspended Ensemble »
For the first time, Prada showcased its resort show in its newly renovated Osservatorio, a top-floor exhibition space for contemporary photography in the Prada store in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. Millennial pink and mirrors combined with benches oriented towards a rooftop view of the Galleria’s dome.

Autumn/winter 2017: « Teen Dream »
Inspired by the « bare simplicity of everyday life », AMO studio constructed a series of domestic set-ups lined by an extending wooden ‘boiserie’, a partition between the private, Seventies-inspired teenage bedrooms and an urban front covered in posters.

Spring/summer 2018: « A Story Within a Story »
Designed by AMO studio in collaboration with NYC-based design studio 2×4, the spring set featured the work of eight visionary artists – including Brigid Elva, Giuliana Maldini, Trina Robbins and Fiona Staples – whose artistic aim was to illustrate women in a « uniquely empowering way ». The graphic panels also included archival work of Tarpé Mills, creator of the first female action hero – which popped up again in the collection.

Vogue – 20 février 2018

How A Legendary Romance Became The Theme Of Erdem’s Latest Collection

For his autumn/winter 2018 show, the designer describes his sea-crossing journey to bring Adele Astaire, the American dancer turned English aristocrat, to life.

by ELLEN BURNEY

For Turkish-Canadian designer Erdem Moralıoğlu, show season starts with an exchange with his favourite music curator, French sound artist Frédéric Sanchez. “We always start banging heads about what the music will be quite early on in the process,” Moralıoğlu tells me at his headquarters in an old Whitechapel warehouse in London’s East End. “There’s always some sort of narrative and he send me things and I send him things. One ritual I find is that by listening to the music – often on the way to work – I can start to visually understand what look one might be, what look two is, etc.”

The soundtrack is still “a work in progress” when we meet, five days before his autumn/winter 2018 show – but the tone is set in old castle stone. A collection of tweedy kilts, corduroy and jewel-encrusted gowns are inspired by “the extraordinary romance” between 1920s American Broadway star Adele Astaire – sister of Fred – and Charles Cavendish, an English lord and son of the 9th Duke of Devonshire. The theme was cemented at Lismore Castle in Ireland, their marital home. “I love the idea of this vaudeville, tinselly, kind of extraordinary girl who came from Hollywood then came to Ireland,” says Moralıoğlu, who visited the castle in Cork. “A shine mixed with something tweedy and woolly – mixing these two kinds of worlds that really don’t mix together at all.”

It’s 8.30 am and two coffees down, Moralıoğlu is sitting for his portrait. Hot onn the heels of a sold-out collaboration with H&M in November, 2018 is coming on in leaps and bounds. In addition to his upcoming runway collection, Moralıoğlu – who founded his label in 2005 and is best known for his demure and decorative gowns – is also designing a series of costumes for a Royal Ballet performance, which premieres in March. “I am thrilled. I am spending so much time at the Opera House at the moment working on the ballet with [choreographer and the Royal Ballet’s Artistic Associate] Christopher Wheeldon, so that’s been the most exciting thing this year, getting the wheels in motion.”

Moralıoğlu came to Lismore Castle by way of Chatsworth House, home to the Devonshires. “I was with my friend Laura Burlington, who is married to William Cavendish, son of the Duke of Devonshire, and I actually ended up going to Ireland. She was showing me around and the perimeter of this pool that Adele Astaire had built really kind of stuck in my head – the outline of this 1920s pool that was then filled in.”

To begin, he looked back to Adele’s early performance days as a dancer. “These kind of drop-waist. 1920s shapes felt really interesting and modern,” he says, with a nod to his splendid silver drop-waist dress embroidered in sequins. “But also these kilts and skirts that had kind of inverted box pleats in wool,” he says pointing to an old photograph of a traditional Irish costume.

He describes the autumn collection as feeling quite “masculine and dark.” Tweeds, such as an oversized double-breasted men’s coat, are combined with bright, light jacquards. “There was also that idea of the formality of a castle and what finishings you would find in there combined with something that’s quite casual and almost day[wear]. Like what would happen if you took Fred Astaire’s jacket or her husband’s tweed coat over this kind of shiny tulle dress.”

Moralıoğlu turns to his mood board, pointing to black and white portraits of Adele. “The graphic polka dots seemed to be a weird recurring theme.” They bounce throughout his own collection in oversized tulle overlays. Then there’s a picture of a Twenties star-spangled swimsuit that Moralıoğlu spotted at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. “I love the idea of the star motif mixed with these very Irish tweeds.” The motif shines on a cape, skirt and dress.

Back at Chatsworth, he worked with the archive and the family walked him through this “whole world”, where Astaire and her future husband met when she was performing in London. Moralıoğlu was presented with some scrapbooks made by a local family in Ireland “who were totally obsessed” with the romance between Adele and Lord Cavendish. “I felt that there was something so wonderful about this family that observed the couple at a distance, and almost documented what would happen to them.”

At this point, I suggest an alternative career as a biographer. “Maybe film,” he muses. “Maybe?” But he’s not serious. He returns to his current muse. “In a way I really need that kind of narrative to be the catalyst of something, and then from there things come. Whether or not the stories are legible when you see the collection in stores, I don’t know, but it’s that tool that I need.”

Dior Homme fall winter 2018 19 – Empty Space – Composition originale

Dior Homme fall winter 2018 19 – Savoir Faire – Composition originale

Dior Homme fall winter 2018 2019 casting – Composition originale

janv. 222018

Vogue – 22 janvier 2018

Dior Homme – Vogue

by SARAH MOWER
How weird is it to think that the president of France, Emmanuel Macron, aged 40, was born only five years before “Forever Young” by Alphaville—the 1984 New Wave/synth hit Kris Van Assche chose to close his Christian Dior Homme show today? Van Assche, a Belgian in Paris, is just one year older than the man who runs France. That’s pause for thought, the principal one (since we’re dealing with fashion) being along the lines of a) the enduring importance of the two-piece suit to masculine power in the civic, corporate, and global private wealth spheres, and b) the synonymity of Christian Dior as a brand with French national identity. In other words, there’s no way Van Assche cannot deal face-on with the suits.
He did it, perhaps self-knowingly, by reflecting on the boy inside his middle-aged peers—the ex-raver generation which is seizing positions of power in the 21st century. The jacket Van Assche was wearing backstage had a black label tacked to the top of one sleeve cuff, reading “Christian Dior Atelier,” a sartorial heritage signal indicating handmade tailoring values (as well as a bit of an inside-out Martin Margiela-ism). So far, so manly.
But bless him, in this age of roiling gender politics, Van Assche’s first instinct had been to bring in an expert woman from the Christian Dior women’s atelier to help him work on how to adapt the manual know-how of Dior’s late-’40s and early-’50s women’s tailoring, and turn it into “sharp” suits for men. “I wanted to make it very body-conscious. With streetwear, more or less everything has become blurred, loose,” he said.
But what about keeping the boy-thoughts alive? Van Assche returned to his own teen memories, of “the first tattoo you got when you were 15,” and how it was clubbing in the ’90s, layering short-sleeved T-shirts over long-sleeves. And the baggy but high-waist jeans; and the other kids, who stuck to polo shirts and synthetic anoraks with terrible prints. In fact, Van Assche was never a clubber, but he knew all about it, from his bedroom. Yet all that stuff is now idolized by a second generation as classic vintage style.
Maybe Emmanuel Macron is just the same; occupied with studying as he was, yet still hyperaware that there’s a young generation coming up who might buy into new politics, new style. On the Christian Dior runway, both generations were represented—the original cool ’90s guys who are now wearing the suits and carrying the briefcases, and generation Z, who everyone and his strategist now wants to capture.

The Guardian – 22 janvier 2018

Dior Homme looks to win over millennial market at Paris show

Hannah Marriott

Hundreds of teenagers jostled outside the Grand Palais in Paris on Saturday morning, and they weren’t there for the Irving Penn retrospective. The object of their fascination was Robert Pattinson, whose arrival at the Dior Homme fashion show drew shrieks from the crowd.

Inside, Pattinson sat next to Karl Lagerfeld, a longtime fan of the brand, who wore his usual uniform of precise monochrome suit and fingerless gloves, with the unlikely addition of a scruffy white beard.

Lagerfeld did Dior Homme’s mythology no harm when he famously said that the motivation for his six-and-a-half stone weight loss, in the noughties, was the desire to fit into the brand’s skinny suits.

He would have found much to appreciate in the opening half of the show, which consisted of a series of slim black suits in single- and double-breasted iterations.

The rest felt fresh and unexpected. There were baggy ravers’ jeans and short-sleeved t-shirts layered over long-sleeved versions, and a repeated heavy metal-style motif embroidered on to rucksacks and bomber jackets, used as a print and a pendant, and shaved into models’ hair.

There were models of a variety of ages, not just 20-somethings. The theme, said the show notes, was “Forever Young”, a reference to the 1984 Alphaville song that was mixed in on the soundtrack with A-Ha, Technotronic and other 1980s hits. The brand’s artistic director, Kris Van Assche, is an 80s music fan who has recently signed up the Pet Shop Boys as campaign stars.

It seemed designed to appeal to new customers while sparking nostalgia for others. More evidence of Dior’s attempts to woo the millennial market came in the presence of the Instagram star Bella Hadid, who wore a pair of the label’s new squidgy trainers, Dior Homme Runners, Dior’s answer to Balenciaga’s hugely successful Triple S trainers.

Dior Homme fall winter 2018 2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

Business Of Fashion – 15 janvier 2018

Tradition as Salvation at Prada

The Prada set was a warehouse stacked high with crates, like the final scene of « Raiders of the Lost Ark. »

« There are strange things happening in those boxes, » Miuccia Prada mused. « Strange animals, strange machines, strange preparations for some strange transformation. » Like an entire civilisation in cold storage. Or like an Amazon warehouse, as captured by Andreas Gursky in a recent numbing panorama. All human endeavour distilled into a brown cardboard box, borne by drone to your address. The show invitation was a mini-flatpack version of just such a box.

Last season, Miuccia was energised by a simmering anger. This season, that idealistic energy initially seemed as though it had surrendered to a dystopian what’s-the-point?. The designer asked a handful of her favourite architects to re-interpret black nylon, the ground zero of the Prada phenomenon, and what they came back with amplified the initial end-of-days impression. Instead of the classic backpack, Rem Koolhaas made a front-pack, perfect for absorbing an apocalyptic wallop. Konstantin Grcic made an apron and a hood (why was I thinking Cormac McCarthy?). Herzog & de Meuron envisaged a world in which language had lost its power, where words were mere decoration. The models sported corporate IDs on their industrial nylon ensembles. “We are all controlled,” Miuccia declared. ‘We think we’re free, but we’re a kind of species.” Another brick in the wall? Was that Pink Floyd on Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack?

We are a species, of course, just one that has profound difficulty slotting itself into the continuum of life that otherwise dictates the rhythm of the planet on which we evolved. It was riveting watching the way Miuccia built a collection of clothing on such a notion, juxtaposing graphics from previous collections, making mutant combinations, like a banana-print shirt laid over a fairisle sweater. The bananas were licked by the flames of another Prada print and — apologies in advance for the quantum leap — all I could think about was Hawaii’s false alarm on Saturday. It was, of course, pure coincidence that Miuccia reanimated yet another print from years ago of a post-nuclear Honolulu landscape, but I will always give her credit for a rare prescience in fashion.

Maybe the prescience is pragmatism. Either way, she persuasively nullified that initial negativity when she said that « intelligence, humanity, generosity and possibly love » would save the world. But note that she didn’t mention lovey-dovey beauty. That wasn’t this collection. If Amazon is the contemporary repository of human knowledge, the 21st century simulacrum of the Great Library of Alexandria, Miuccia chose to turn her latest outing into a comprehensive education in the history of her house: from the uniformity of the black nylon, puffed into exaggerated power silhouettes, through the myriad of prints, into colour and finally the reassuring classicism of tailoring in camel and charcoal grey. From hard to soft. Tradition as salvation…it was a potent closer. And Michael Nyman’s lyrical theme from « The Piano » played as an additional acknowledgment of the profound truth that beauty can, in fact, offer succour at the cold, hard, bitter end.

SHOWstudio – 11 janvier 2018

Georgina Evans reports on the Craig Green show

Crochet patches, almost corset-like in shape and orange in tone, were a welcome addition sat atop slim knits and wide, straight jeans. These were romantic too, they felt a little like delicate life-jackets but perhaps that’s too much of a literal image for Green – he is drawn to more abstract and conceptual references.
After the loud, vivacious frivolities of Charles Jeffrey the night before, Craig Green’s Monday morning offering – showing in a spacious warehouse in Lambeth – was a welcome reverence to London Fashion Week Men’s. Green’s designs are soothing, often deeply intelligent and honourably humble – the latter still pleasantly surprising considering Green has picked up the British Fashion Award for the second year in a row.

This season, Green showed us both the expected and the unexpected; candied brights, the return of knits, drawstrings and patchworks and the familiar, structural almost altar-like aspects too.

Green had been drawing from ‘the dutiful idea of falling in line’ and linear patterns and silhouettes were certainly a focal point here, and indeed often are in Green’s work. Looks were trimmed with fin panelling, giving a black linear shadow around each model and forcing the eye to scan in full circle, tubular piping followed up the legs and in some cases onto arms and chest, giving a slightly aquatic aesthetic. As too, did the slim rope ties across the sternum and the layered boxy trouser – the latter reminiscent of foam floats and buoyancy.

Similarly, the set – a huge sprawling blackened out space, with floor-to-ceiling sections and an audience divide down the runway, provided the rhythm of lapping waves as models moved in and out of visibility. In the light, out of the light. In the light, out of the light. The sombre darkness mirrored that of the soundtrack – Van Der Graaf Generator’s House With No Door spoke of knowing lines so well ‘I am ready to tell whoever will finally come in of the line in my mind that’s cold in the night’ – highlighting Green’s aforementioned explorations. 


Beautiful hooded patchwork coats and jackets reminded one of the S/S 18 offerings, but these were less printed and more focal on drippings of string and strong gig lines from neck to hem.

The final looks, the more structural of the pieces, were a continuation from last season, here with bow-like shape and dangling strings, springing as the models walked. There was something romantic in these pieces, they bounced with the quick march of the model as if with intent and purpose, yet there was also a dark emotion to them that felt a little lost at sea.

Crochet patches, almost corset-like in shape and orange in tone, were a welcome addition sat atop slim knits and wide, straight jeans. These were romantic too, they felt a little like delicate life-jackets but perhaps that’s too much of a literal image for Green – he is drawn to more abstract and conceptual references.

As the show drew to a close, it felt as though the audience had let out a peaceful sigh. Consistently silent, consistently strong. Green had done it again – effortlessly stoic, calm and handsome.

Craig Green’s Fall Winter 2018 – 19 – Backstage video – Composition originale

Prada Men’s and Women’s fall winter 2018 2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

déc. 112017

11/12/2017
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LE VOYAGEUR 00.48

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ERDEM x H&M Exclusive Fashion Event in Los Angeles – October 2017 – Composition originale

Miu Miu women’s spring summer 2018 – Composition originale pour la video

Roberto Cavalli women’s spring summer 2018 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video

Salvatore Ferragamo women’s spring summer 2018 fashion show – Composition originale

MSGM women’s spring summer 2018 fashion show – Composition originale

Prada women’s spring summer 2018 fashion show – Composition originale

Victoria Beckham spring summer 2018 fashion show – Composition originale

nov. 272017

Miu Miu resort 2018 fashion show – Composition originale

nov. 272017

27/11/2017
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FILM SONORE 24 31.11

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Miu Miu spring summer 2018

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Comme des Garçons women’s spring summer 2018

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Nina Ricci women’s spring summer 2018

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Sonia Rykiel spring summer 2018

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Prada women’s spring summer 2018

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Marni women’s spring summer 2018

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MSGM women’s spring summer 2018

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Roberto Cavalli women’s spring summer 2018

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Missoni women’s spring summer 2018

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Erdem spring summer 2018

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Mary Katrantzou spring summer 2018

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Anna Sui spring summer 2018

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Victoria Beckham spring summer 2018

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Miu Miu Resort spring summer 2018

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Dior Homme spring summer 2018

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Comme des Garçons Homme spring summer 2018

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Prada men’s spring summer 2018

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MSGM men’s spring summer 2018

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Marni men’s spring summer 2018

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Prada Resort spring summer 2018

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nov. 242017

i-D – 24 Novembre 2017


jil sander, grande prêtresse du minimalisme, s’expose pour la première fois

Sophie Abriat

Une nouvelle exposition célèbre les 40 ans de mode de celle que l’on surnommait dans les années 90 « The Queen of clean ». Le directeur artistique Marc Ascoli et l’illustrateur sonore Frédéric Sanchez qui ont travaillé à ses côtés racontent l’exposition.

Vidéos des défilés, vêtements, photographies de mode, campagnes de pub, parfums et cosmétiques, bande-son signé Frédéric Sanchez, salle dédiée à l’architecture des boutiques : l’exposition est une immersion totale dans l’univers de Jil Sander. A cela s’ajoute même un jardin (de l’artiste Norbert Schoerner) réalisé à partir de paysages filmés par des drones depuis une propriété du nord de l’Allemagne, à Plöner See, où la créatrice a l’habitude de se ressourcer. Une section est également réservée aux liens entre la styliste et l’art contemporain (notamment à travers le mouvement « Arte Povera » représenté entre autres par les artistes Mario Merz and Alighiero e Boetti). Très tôt, la créatrice a collectionné des œuvres de Robert Ryman, Cy Twombly, Ad Reinhardtouou encore Mario Merz (avec qui elle a d’ailleurs collaboré dans le cadre de la Biennale de Florence « Looking at Fashion » en 1996). C’est le Musée des arts appliqués de Francfort, un bâtiment construit en 1984 et dessiné par l’architecte New-Yorkais Richard Meier qui abrite cette rétrospective. Il fallait bien une exposition d’une telle ampleur pour cette adepte du minimalisme qui a transformé notre façon de nous habiller.

Le curating – élaboré par la créatrice elle-même et Matthias Wagner K, directeur du Musée – recrée l’expérience Jil Sander. Cette dernière ne souhaitait pas une simple juxtaposition de silhouettes, déconnectées de leur contexte, sinon une expérience totale. Les deux partenaires ont travaillé pendant 18 mois à l’élaboration de cette exposition. Pour l’occasion, la styliste s’est replongée pour la première fois dans ses archives. Elle a demandé à Frédéric Sanchez – auteur des bandes-son de ses défilés depuis le début des années 1990 – de créer l’environnement sonore de l’exposition. « J’ai travaillé sur l’idée du déplacement du son à travers 10 programmations informatiques. Quand on se déplace, les sons évoluent – comme un nuage du son ou un parfum du son. Une forme d’architecture dans l’architecture, indique l’illustrateur sonore. Ensemble, nous avons pensé le son comme une enveloppe protectrice, une coque, qui accompagnerait les visiteurs. Comme quelque chose de tactile aussi. Cette exposition est une expérience sensorielle, une vraie expérience de mode : tous les sens sont mis à contribution. Je suis très touché que Jil m’ait donné cette opportunité car c’est rare de pouvoir aller ainsi jusqu’au bout des choses ».

Des photos signées par les plus grands photographes de mode avec qui la créatrice a collaboré – Irving Penn, Peter Lindbergh, Nick Knight, Craig McDean, David Sims, Mario Sorrenti ou encore Jean-François Lepage – sont projetées sur les murs d’une salle immense. A la direction artistique de ces campagnes de pub : Marc Ascoli qui a travaillé pour Jil Sander pendant 12 ans à partir du début des années 1990. « C’était très émouvant de découvrir l’exposition et de revoir pour l’occasion l’équipe de Jil de l’époque. C’est une personnalité charismatique, qui met beaucoup d’intensité dans son travail. Il y a peu de femmes dans le secteur de la mode qui ont eu l’ambition de créer un tel univers. Cette exposition est une consécration de son travail », indique le directeur artistique. Dans l’exposition, les imagées créées par Marc Ascoli sont célébrées (on note la présence de quelques clichés jusqu’ici jamais dévoilés) : des images influentes et intemporelles. On pense entre autres à ces deux campagnes de pub (devenues aujourd’hui des posts classiques sur Instagram et Pinterest, indicateur de leur popularité !) : celle photographiée par Craig McDean avec Amber Valletta (automne-hiver 95-96) et celle shootée par David Sims avec Angela Lindvall (automne-hiver 97-98). « Ces images fonctionnent parce qu’elles sont réelles et incarnées. Ce sont justement cette émotion et cette incarnation qui sont recherchées aujourd’hui », souligne Marc Ascoli.

C’est en 1973 en Allemagne que la styliste lance sa première collection. Elle la présente dans la boutique qu’elle a ouverte cinq ans plus tôt à Hambourg. Coupes nettes, tissus de qualité (Jil Sander a suivi des études d’ingénieur textile), monochromes : la patte de celle que l’on surnommera dans les années 1990 « The Queen of clean » pour la précision et la pureté de son design est déjà là. En 1979, elle développe sa ligne de parfums ; « Woman Pure » et « Man Pure » deviendront des classiques. La créatrice invente un nouveau langage vestimentaire, définit une certaine façon de s’habiller. Jil Sander c’est « une signature » indique Marc Ascoli, « une grammaire » renchérit Frédéric Sanchez. Elle crée pour habiller les femmes indépendantes, actives et les invite à se libérer de l’ornement, du décoratif. « Si vous portez Jil Sander, vous n’êtes pas à la mode, vous êtes moderne », disait-elle à l’époque. Ses principes de conception – l’harmonie des proportions, la tridimensionnalité, l’euphémisme – constituent les bases de son design. L’habillement est chez elle le reflet de la conscience de soi. Pour Marc Ascoli « Jil Sander a vocation à raconter une attitude et pas seulement des vêtements. Avec elle, la personnalité des femmes est plus importante que les vêtements. »

En 1989, forte de son succès, son entreprise est cotée à la bourse de Francfort, elle défile alors deux fois par an à Milan. Le pull en V en cachemire et la parfaite chemise blanche deviennent ses best-sellers. En 1993, en collaboration avec l’architecte américain Michael Gabellini, la styliste imagine son premier magasin phare de 1000 mètres carrés à Paris, au 50 Avenue Montaigne. En 1999, elle vend sa marque à Prada, pour finalement quitter le navire six mois plus tard, suite à des désaccords avec Patrizio Bertelli, PDG et mari de Miuccia Prada. Coup de théâtre, elle revient en 2003 mais quitte une seconde fois l’entreprise en 2004. Raf Simons devient alors directeur artistique de la marque, perpétuant la mode minimaliste de la créatrice allemande. Il restera aux commandes du prêt-à-porter féminin et masculin jusqu’en 2012. En 2006, Prada vend la société à un groupe d’investissement britannique ; elle sera rachetée en 2008 par un groupe japonais. C’est aujourd’hui Lucie (ex codirectrice artistique de la mode femme chez Dior) et Luke Meier qui sont en charge de la direction artistique de la marque. « C’est un certain regard qui est donné à voir avec cette exposition. Un regard intimiste qui ne s’adressait en définitive qu’à un certain public à l’heure où la mode est aujourd’hui une industrie globalisée. C’est aussi une bonne leçon pour aujourd’hui : quand on veut plaire à tout le monde, on prend le risque de ne plaire à personne », souligne Marc Ascoli. « C’est une vraie proposition sur comment on peut montrer de la mode. Dans cette exposition, je n’ai rien senti de daté », conclut Frédéric Sanchez. L’exposition est d’ailleurs baptisée « Jil Sander : Present Tense ».

« Jil Sander: Present Tense » au Musée des arts appliqués de Francfort, jusqu’au 6 mai 2018.

nov. 142017

WWD – Novembre 2017

Vogue UK – 8 novembre 2017

Jil Sander On Her First Solo Exhibition
As Jil Sander’s first solo exhibition opens at the Museum Angewandte Kunst in Frankfurt, Vogue caught five minutes with the designer to ask why now was the right time to delve into the archives.

by ALICE NEWBOLD

“Matthias Wagner K repeatedly proposed the project,” Jil Sander told Vogue of the museum director’s mission to house her first retrospective in his Frankfurt establishment. “He values my work, and I felt that it could be fruitful curating it cooperatively, so I finally found time to go through my archives”.

The show, which is set to run until May 16 2018, occupies over 32,000 square feet of display space in Frankfurt’s Museum of Applied Arts. Sander “immediately felt at home in the Richard Meier building from the 1980s,” she explained. “It was exciting to use the vast space and create a symbiosis between my and Meier’s work.”

Of narrowing down the pieces to populate the space, she said: “It was a long process. I knew from the beginning that I didn’t want to simply exhibit past collections, so I radically reduced the actual fashion pieces.”

“The display concentrates on three-dimensional cuts and sculptural silhouettes,” she continued. “Since I prefer to see my designs on living beings rather than mannequins, I included runway videos. Forty shows were recut in an interesting way to highlight details and create the Jil Sander atmosphere and perspective.”

Visitors can also expect flagship store architecture, interior design and beauty products which all have the same “modern design language” and “handwriting” that has stayed the same throughout her career. Shout outs also go to the artists she has collaborated with on brand imagery – Irving Penn, Peter Lindbergh, Nick Knight, Craig McDean and David Sims – in an extra room, and Frédéric Sanchez, who she has worked with on runway sound for 27 years, has done the sound installations.

“I hope that visitors understand that the vision applies to everything in life,” she mused. The standout piece to look out for? “I don’t have a personal favourite. Everything was right in its time. But I like to see that many designs don’t look dated today.”

Wallpaper – 8 novembre 2017

Taking form: Jil Sander reflects on her new exhibition at the Museum Angewandte Kunst

As ‘Jil Sander: Present Tense’ opens at the Museum Angewandte Kunst in Frankfurt am Main, Nick Vinson speaks to the legendary German designer about the impetus behind her first solo museum exhibition. The 3,000 sq m show, curated by Matthias Wagner K, takes an immersive and multisensory approach, consisting of large scale tableaux and installations that celebrate Sander’s purist, understated and elegant approach to aesthetics. The exhibition spans genres including product design, garden art, architecture and cosmetics, and concretes the designer’s status in the canon of modern design.

Nick Vinson: Why did you choose to put on this exhibition?
Jil Sander: My archive was not very organised, and an exhibition deadline was a great way to make me speed up the archive revision.

How long have you been working on it?
About 18 months.

What would you say are your design principles?
Innovative quality materials, interesting proportions, perfection in details, energising shapes and a truly three-dimensional execution.

What is Jil Sander’s concept of purism?
The desire to capture the essence of the modern moment as it unfolds season after season. Purism to me means leaving behind unnecessary historical baggage, decorations, conventions, while concentrating on truly contemporary shapes and materials. I always wanted my designs to convey a readiness and openness towards the future.

People may be surprised to learn there has always been room in your life for the baroque. How is your personal taste different from the way you express opulence in your work?
As a fashion designer I tried to do justice to individual proportions by diversifying my collections and breaking them down to multiple possible combinations. The same thing happens when I have to choose the interior design for a building. The house I live in in Hamburg was built in the historicist period at the end of the 19th century by Martin Haller. I tried to give it a modern design, but that didn’t work. So I got Renzo Mongiardino to help me. Under his tutelage I learned that all style periods have a purist version of enlightened craftsmanship and choice materials. We chose a Renaissance interior which did justice to the house and created harmony.

When I think of you I think of the perfect white shirt. What is about your shirts that make them so covetable and why are they such an object of obsession?
I have about a hundred white shirts in my wardrobe. On the one hand, the periodical revision of the outlines of the white shirt is a study in shape, workmanship and quality. On the other hand, these revisions are echoes of a changing zeitgeist. You have to refresh a classic like the white shirt all the time.

Whether it’s a white shirt or a double-faced cashmere coat, fabric development has always been an essential element of your work. Why is research and development into yarn and fabric so important?
The shape and overall look of a piece of clothing is, to a great extent, a function of the fabric. I was interested in materials which lend themselves to a sculptural use. It helps if a fabric has character, a surprising lightness or even a distinct weight. If you want to create new shapes, to start with the material is a great way to get inspired.

Everything I own from you has a special label that reads ‘Tailor Made’. Why is construction so integral to a Jil Sander garment?
If you want to avoid clothes that just cling to the body, you need sartorial construction. This includes the development of patterns, innovative inlay and fine-tuning through repeated fitting. The result will be an autonomous shape that moves in dynamic harmony with the body.

You once said you had a marriage of aesthetics with your architect Michael Gabellini. This exhibition celebrates your creative collaboration with him, as well as with photographers like Peter Lindbergh, Irving Penn, David Sims and Craig McDean, sound artist Frédéric Sanchez and designers like Fabien Baron, Ezra Petronio and Peter Schmidt, who worked with you on your logo and perfume bottles. How do you choose them and what is the collaborative process like?
I like to collaborate with people whose creative work I find interesting. The collaboration itself is a process. You need to find a common language.

The last time I saw you we spoke about your garden in the north of Germany; your exhibition covers aesthetics, material and form of fashion and product design, architecture and garden art. Tell me about working with Penelope Hobhouse on that.
I was inspired by the famous Sissinghurst rose gardens. Our garden project encompassed the design of the surrounding landscape. It is an attempt to bridge the concept of the protected Renaissance theme garden and the English idea of a democratic landscape.

Frankfurter Allgemeine – 6 novembre 2017

Jil Sander in Frankfurt : Die Schau und die Scheue

Der Mode ganz nah: Die ersten Besucher in der Ausstellung am Freitagabend. Bild: Helmut Fricke
Modedesigner locken überall auf der Welt Scharen von Besuchern in die Museen. Schafft es das
Frankfurter Museum Angewandte Kunst mit Jil Sander?

Ihr Auftritt am Donnerstagvormittag in Frankfurt erinnert an damals nach ihren Schauen in Mailand.
Nachdem das letzte Model zum Finale vom Laufsteg Richtung Backstage abgetreten war, stand Jil
Sander für gewöhnlich von einem Moment auf den anderen dort. Sie zeigte sich dann kurz den
Fotografen, und weg war sie schon wieder. Sollten sich andere tief verbeugen oder gar ein paar Meter
über den Laufsteg schreiten. Ihr Ding war das nie.

Nun ist die Frau Jil Sander schon länger nicht mehr an dem Haus Jil Sander tätig. Vor vier Jahren um
diese Zeit verließ sie es zum dritten Mal in ihrer Karriere. Am Donnerstagvormittag aber erinnert ihr
Auftritt trotzdem an damals. Auf der zweiten Etage des Frankfurter Museums Angewandte Kunst (MAK)
haben sich etliche Fotografen und Journalisten versammelt, dann kommt die Modedesignerin um die
Ecke. Dunkelblauer Strickpullover, dunkle Hose, so wie damals, wie immer. Dazu trägt sie eine
Sonnenbrille auf der Nase. Sie schaut kurz in die Kameras, streckt die Arme hoch. Und weg ist sie
wieder. Es ist der typische, scheue Jil-Sander-Auftritt. Nur, hier geht es um mehr als damals nach ihren
Schauen. Es ist die überhaupt größte Schau dieser Designerin, und sie ist ihrer eigenen Person
gewidmet. Seit gestern zeigt sie das Frankfurter Museum Angewandte Kunst, und Jil Sander hat daran
in den vergangenen Monaten kräftig mitgearbeitet.

Eine Einzelausstellung über eine prominente Figur aus der Mode. Mit dem Konzept locken Museen
überall auf der Welt gerade Scharen in ihre Häuser. Wer zum Beispiel dieser Tage die Dior-Ausstellung
im Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris sehen will, muss sich nicht nur an Wochenenden hinten
anstellen, also Hunderte Meter weit vom Eingang entfernt. Vor den Türen des neuen Yves-Saint-
Laurent-Museums der Stadt sieht es nicht besser aus, Besucher brauchen hier sogar noch mehr
Geduld. Und das Victoria & Albert Museum in London zeigt in diesem Herbst das Werk des spanischen
Couturiers Cristóbal Balenciaga. An die Besuchermenge, die vor zwei Jahren durch die Räume zur
Ausstellung über Alexander McQueen zog, wird das Haus trotzdem nur schwer herankommen. 480
000 verkaufte Tickets waren es innerhalb von fünf Monaten, die am besten besuchte Ausstellung in der
Geschichte des Museums.
:
Kurz vor Schluss gab es sogar Zeitslots für mitten in der Nacht, zwischen 22 und 5.30 Uhr morgens. Es
handelte sich dabei ja auch um jene legendäre Schau, die 2011 im New Yorker Metropolitan Museum
(Met) zu sehen war (674 000 Tickets) und damit überhaupt erst das Konzept der Ausstellung über
einen Modedesigner auf ein neues Blockbuster-Niveau gebracht hat, mit Warteschlangen um die
Straßenecken. Klar gibt es seit Jahrzehnten Modeausstellungen, in jenem New Yorker Met etwa, seit
die ehemalige Chefredakteurin der amerikanischen „Vogue“, Diana Vreeland, dort 1973 als Beraterin
anfing. Aber Mode im Museum, das war zugleich lange Zeit ein schwieriger Fall. Mode will getragen
und nicht hinter Glaskästen konserviert werden. Mode im Museum, das könnte allerdings ebens0
gerade deshalb funktionieren. Da sie ihren Platz im Leben der Menschen selbstverständlicher hat als,
sagen wir, die Alten Meister.

„Man wusste, man zieht es an und ist gewappnet“

Die vage Vorstellung, die man schon von einem Modemacher habe, bevor man in die Ausstellung
gehe, sei ein Grund für den Erfolg in Museen, sagt auch Matthias Wagner K, Direktor des Frankfurter
Museums Angewandte Kunst und verantwortlich für die Schau über Jil Sander. Seit fünf Jahren ist er
hier tätig, Jil Sander habe von Beginn an ganz oben auf seiner Liste für eine Ausstellung gestanden.
Vor anderthalb Jahren habe man sich dann zum ersten Mal getroffen. Matthias Wagner K bot Jil
Sander nicht etwa eine Etage, sondern das gesamte Haus an, für die Gestaltung einer Ausstellung, die
jene vage Vorstellung für Besucher konkretisieren sollte. Besonders Frauen, die mit der Designerin
aufwuchsen, dürften sich angesprochen fühlen. Jene, die Jil Sander in den achtziger und neunziger
Jahren einkleidete, als diese auf dem besten Weg waren, sich in der noch stärker von Männern
dominierten Welt zu behaupten.

Matthias Wagner K erinnert sich an Frauen, die ihm in den vergangenen anderthalb Jahren während
der Arbeit an der Ausstellung begegnet sind und von jenem Gefühl berichteten. „Die gesagt haben, in
Kleidern von Jil Sander konnte ich so in den Gerichtssaal gehen und mich geschützt und präpariert
fühlen für das, was vor mir liegt.“ Wer sich die hochpreisigen Stücke zu der Zeit leisten konnte, musste
noch nicht einmal sonderlich stilsicher sein. „Man wusste, man zieht es an und ist gewappnet.“ Es ging
der Modemacherin Jil Sander ja um sie, um diese Kundin, und dadurch unterschied Sander sich
tatsächlich von ihren überwiegend männlichen Kollegen, die Mode oft als etwas Theatralisches
verstanden.

Dass Jil Sander das ganz anders sah, zeigt auch das MAK: Ein ganzer Raum ist einer Serie schlichter,
überwiegend schwarzer Kleidungsstücke gewidmet, Mänteln, so voluminös wie ein Kokon, oder mit
festen Gurten, Blazern, Cocktailkleidern. Die Entwürfe sind mal dreißig Jahre alt und jetzt neu
aufgelegt, mal vier Jahre. Alles ist stimmig – und stark, selbst an den leblosen Puppen. Und apropos
Mode, die im Museum schnell fad wirken kann: Der französische Klangkünstler Frédéric Sanchez hat
für jeden Raum ein Konzept entworfen. Der Sound zu den schwarzen Stücken: entschlossene Schritte,
Klaviertöne. Eine Video-Installation ihrer Laufsteg-Präsentationen aus den Jahren 1989 bis 2014 wird
hier nicht auf einer Leinwand gezeigt, es sind drei. Die Clips nehmen den Besucher ein, indem sie
chronologisch ungeordnet von Look zu Look springen und trotzdem sorgfältig editiert sind von dem
Fotografen Norbert Schoerner. Es sind Nahaufnahmen, die über den Zeitraum überraschend stimmig
geblieben sind: Kaschmir, technische Stoffe, scharfe Kanten, viel Dunkelblau, Schwarz zu Weiß,
Baumwollblusen, Hosenanzüge, Mäntel.

Mit Stücken wie diesen schaffte sie sich damals ja auch ihre treue Gefolgschaft, in den Achtzigern.
Heidemarie Jiline Sander, 1943 in Schleswig-Holstein geboren, hatte als Textilingenieurs-Studentin
einige Zeit in Kalifornien verbracht und arbeitete nach ihrer Rückkehr in den sechziger Jahren als
Moderedakteurin in Hamburg. Was ihr fehlte, waren die richtigen Kleider, die sie zum Erzählen ihrer
Geschichten brauchte. Also bat sie die Hersteller um Änderungen. Es war der Beginn ihres eigenen
kreativen Schaffens. Sie eröffnete einen Laden, begann eine eigene Linie zu entwerfen. Damals war
sie 24.

„Die positive Energie fand ich erstaunlich“

Später gründete sie einen Produktionsstandort in Deutschland, 1989 brachte sie das Unternehmen an
die Börse. Es waren dann auch in den Neunzigern nicht die Kleider, sondern vielmehr das wichtiger
werdende Geschäft mit den Accessoires, das ihr Lebenswerk bedrohte. 1999 hatte sie ihr
Unternehmen mehrheitlich an die Prada-Group verkauft, es sollte in Schuhe und Taschen investiert
werden. Die Zusammenarbeit lief nicht gut, ein Jahr später verließ die Kreativdirektorin das von ihr
gegründete Haus. Allerdings kam sie 2003 ein zweites Mal wieder, ging kurz darauf. Und übernahm im
Jahr 2012 abermals für drei Saisons die kreative Leitung. Jil Sander war also nie richtig weg, obwohl
sie schon länger keine Mode mehr macht.

Und obwohl Mode überhaupt in Deutschland nicht gerade als hohes Kulturgut wahrgenommen wird, ist
Sander eine Ausnahme. Es liegt vor allem an der engen Beziehung, die viele Kundinnen bis heute zu
ihr haben, selbst wenn sie seit Jahren keinen Fuß mehr in eine Jil-Sander-Boutique gesetzt haben.
Jene Frauen, die noch immer ihre Stücke aus vergangenen Jahrzehnten wie selbstverständlich tragen,
ohne dass man es den Teilen ansieht. „Die positive Energie fand ich erstaunlich“, sagte die
Modemacherin dem F.A.Z.-Magazin im September im Hinblick auf die Reaktionen zur geplanten
Ausstellung. „Ich begreife noch nicht so recht, warum die Kundinnen so intensiv mit meinen Entwürfen
leben. Diese emotionale Beteiligung ist mir rätselhaft. Ich konnte das nie richtig einschätzen.“
Jil Sander, die eine der führenden Modemarken schuf, ist wieder da. Die große Ausstellung im Museum
Angewandte Kunst in Frankfurt zeigt, dass ihr Design schon deswegen nicht altert, weil es zeitlos ist.

„Eine tolle Frau“, „eine Heldin“, „eine Ikone“
Es ist auch die Geschichte einer Designerin, wie sie heute nicht mehr möglich wäre. Die Mode ist
längst viel zu flüchtig geworden, als dass so viele Kunden, besonders Frauen, für die das Angebot
riesig ist, einer einzigen Marke in der Form die Treue halten. Phoebe Philo bei Céline, Alessandro
Michele bei Gucci mögen große Namen sein und Kunden intensiv bedienen, über Jahrzehnte werden
sie trotzdem nicht diese Bedeutung in deren Leben haben können. Ganz zu schweigen von der Marke
Jil Sander, von der auch jetzt, unter den neuen Kreativdirektoren Lucie und Luke Meier, nicht klar ist,
an wen sie sich genau richtet.

Um die Marke geht es in dieser Ausstellung ausschließlich in Verbindung mit der Frau Jil Sander, aber
auch deren Bedeutung ist eben eine, wie sie nur in einer anderen Zeit entstehen konnte. Dass die
Bedeutung dieser Frau bis heute, jedenfalls in Deutschland, besteht, dass ihr Name – wie das
jahrzehntealte Logo – kaum Patina bekommen hat, ist außergewöhnlich. Man hört es auch am
Freitagabend, zur Eröffnung der Schau. Beim Smalltalk, in den Gesprächen, die Besucher vor den
Exponaten führen, geht es um „so eine tolle Frau“, „eine Heldin“, „eine Ikone“.

Das Frankfurter MAK nimmt es als Anlass, gerade nicht zu historisieren. Der Titel dieser Schau: „Jil
Sander. Präsens“. Es gibt keine Chronologie, keine Jahreszahlen an Stellen, die eigentlich welche
vertragen würden. Wie etwa die Making-off-Bilder, auf denen die Designerin mit Linda Evangelista zu
sehen ist. So zeitlos wie ihre Stücke tatsächlich sind, präsentiert das MAK hier auch ihr Gesamtwerk,
ihre Herangehensweise an Mode, an Architektur und Kunst, an die Lancierung ihrer eigenen
Kosmetiklinie. Über ihre Arbeit soll man der Designerin in der Einzelausstellung nahekommen; es sollte
ja auch damals, als sie noch Kleider entworfen hat, nie um sie gehen.

Ihre Scheu war, so gesehen, die große Chance. Lieber setzte sie die Kundin an erste Stelle. Maximale
Kontrolle behielt sie selbstverständlich trotzdem. Schuhe und Taschen sind auch hier so exakt stimmig,
als handele es sich um einen Showroom. Und eine Drohne, die zuvor über ihren selbstentworfenen
Garten auf ihrem Landsitz, Gut Ruhleben am Plöner See in Schleswig-Holstein, geflogen ist, hat vor
allem Perfektion aufgenommen. Der beeindruckende Film in der Ausstellung zeigt es. Auch die Skizzen
für diesen Garten von 1985 sprechen für sich: Die Bäume sind nach Farben geordnet, für Rosen, für
Schwertlilien sind konkrete Plätze vorgesehen. Die Kraft der Natur hat gegen sie keine Chance, das
Gartenkonzept steht bis heute.

Bleibt die Frage, ob Jil Sander ein weiteres Beispiel sein kann für das Phänomen der so beliebten
Einzelausstellungen über Modedesigner. Am Eröffnungsabend deutet jedenfalls einiges darauf hin –
die Schlange, die bis zur Straße reicht, die Wartenden, die schon mal am ersten Glas Wein in der Kälte
nippen, die überlegen, ob sie gehen oder bleiben sollen. Könnte erfolgreich werden.

„Jil Sander. Präsens“ läuft bis zum 6. Mai 2018 im Museum Angewandte Kunst in Frankfurt.

Madame Figaro – 2 novembre 2017

Photo Peter Lindberg

Rare et secrète, une des stylistes les plus influentes des années 1990, elle signe à Francfort une exposition qui souligne sa quête de pureté dans tout ce qu’elle entreprend depuis cinquante ans.

Envoyé spécial à Hambourg. – Il s’agit d’une sublime maison vide sur les rives du lac Alster à Hambourg. Juste quelques tableaux contemporains, paysages abstraits, compositions géométriques et dessins au trait restent accrochés dans cette imposante demeure hanséatique, studio de création historique de Jil Sander, avant que sa fondatrice ne vende, en 1999, la majorité des parts de la maison portant son nom. « L’univers » de la créatrice a en effet été expédié le jour précédent notre rencontre au Musée des arts appliqués de Francfort qui lui consacre, du 4 novembre au 6 mai 2018, la première rétrospective de sa carrière.
Au loin, la voix de Mme Sander résonne dans le silence des showrooms quasi inoccupés. Puis, ses pas, sa silhouette agile et, surtout, des yeux qui aujourd’hui pétillent. Retirée de la scène mode après avoir renoncé une troisième fois à présider sa maison à l’automne 2015, elle ne voulait pas accorder d’interview dans le cadre de cet événement, préférant laisser parler les morceaux choisis de ses cinquante années de mode exposés. Les accords juridiques avec la société Jil Sander, propriété du japonais Onward Luxury Group (après avoir été détenue par un fonds britannique et, auparavant, Prada Group), expliquent aussi sans doute cette économie de mots.

Et puis si. La styliste a accepté de recevoir Le Figaro en exclusivité, en ce jour de relâche avant l’installation à Francfort, semblable à ces moments de suspens précédant les défilés quand les croquis ont été envoyés aux fabricants et les premiers prototypes pas encore réalisés. Une tension est perceptible. Une détermination, aussi. Comme tous ses confrères, elle s’est longtemps désintéressée de son propre passé. « On n’a pas le temps ni le choix. Il faut sans cesse avancer, se projeter dans la saison suivante, dit-elle. Le travail avait pris une grande place dans ma vie. Tout est allé très vite. Des modèles, des images, des films d’alors m’ont rappelé une multitude de choses et de personnes. » Il y a un peu plus d’un an, elle se plonge, non sans émotion, dans ses archives. Elle était proche d’accepter de rédiger ses Mémoires, finalement, ce sera une exposition sur 3 000 mètres carrés de modèles, de photos, de musiques et de vidéos reliés par une formidable intégrité. Et par une esthétique minimaliste traversant les années, appliquée à sa mode mais aussi aux cosmétiques, du podium aux boutiques. « Ce que j’ai créé me semble toujours d’actualité », glisse Jil Sander avec humilité, en fin d’entretien, pressée d’aller tout de même vérifier cette modernité in situ le lendemain, s’autorisant des arrangements de dernière minute afin que tout soit tel qu’elle a toujours aimé l’orchestrer.

Entretien exclusif avec la styliste Jil Sander, qui fait l’objet d’une exposition à Francfort.

Le Figaro. – Comment est né ce projet d’exposition  ?
Jil Sander. – Matthias Wagner K, le directeur du Musée des arts appliqués de Francfort, m’avait sollicitée il y a plusieurs années, mais j’ai tardé à accepter sa proposition. Le point de départ étant mes archives, je devais commencer par les classer et les digitaliser. Jusqu’alors, je n’avais eu ni le temps ni la volonté de m’y consacrer. Le passé ne m’intéressant pas durant toutes ces décennies d’activité.

Est-il facile de résumer sa carrière  ?
L’idée n’était pas de faire un résumé, mais de présenter une approche particulière avec une ligne claire. Mon travail est évoqué sous différents angles, à travers notamment une installation multimédia replaçant les collections dans leurs contextes, plutôt que de juxtaposer des dizaines de modèles déconnectés de leur époque comme souvent dans les musées. Bien sûr, il y a tout de même des vêtements exposés afin d’expliquer mes recherches en trois dimensions autour du corps.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur cette installation ?
Le bâtiment qui l’accueille a été construit sur les plans de Richard Meier, un architecte d’une grande modernité qui a également signé le building du Paul Getty Center à Los Angeles. Avant tout, je suis allée à Francfort pour saisir la dimension du lieu. Puis, nous l’avons recréé, à l’échelle réduite dans mon atelier de Hambourg, afin de maîtriser les volumes, se projeter dans l’espace et imaginer pleinement le déroulé de l’exposition. Outre les vidéos des défilés, il y aura une section avec des modèles, une salle dédiée aux parfums et cosmétiques que j’ai adjoints très tôt à mon univers, ainsi que des images et des campagnes publicitaires illustrant mon esthétique. Une partie sera dédiée à l’architecture des magasins, plus précisément, à celui de l’avenue Montaigne à Paris, inauguré au début des années 1990. Cette adresse était très importante à mes yeux – et elle a été beaucoup regardée par d’autres -, car j’avais cherché à redéfinir le concept de la boutique de mode dans ce bâtiment historique. Des œuvres d’art ayant influencé mes créations intègrent aussi l’installation et, pour finir, un jardin virtuel réalisé à partir de paysages filmés par des drones, depuis une propriété dans le nord de l’Allemagne où j’aime me ressourcer depuis longtemps.

L’illustrateur sonore Frédéric Sanchez a été mis à contribution.
Je voulais transmettre ma vision de ce que j’appelle la pureté. Et le son, la lumière, le toucher participent à cette expérience. Par le passé, Frédéric a créé des bandes-son pour mes défilés, extrêmement élaborées et intimes, reliées à ma culture personnelle, grâce à sa formidable connaissance de la musique allemande, du classique au contemporain. Cette fois, il a imaginé un accompagnement musical totalement inédit et envoûtant comme des nuages flottants.

Quels ont été vos échanges avec le commissaire de cette exposition Matthias Wagner K ?
Nous partageons le goût pour une même modernité esthétique. Ensemble, nous avons parcouru tout ce que j’avais réalisé depuis le début des années 1970. La sélection n’est pas définitivement arrêtée au moment où je vous parle. Elle aura lieu sur place, dans la dernière ligne droite, de la même façon que le déroulé d’un défilé est décidé dans les dernières heures.

Qu’est-ce qui vous a rendu le plus fière au regard de vos archives ?
Je suis heureuse qu’un fil rouge apparaisse au final. Que tout ce que j’ai pu signer dans les années 1990, tant en termes de mode que de communication, ne soit absolument pas daté.

Il y a presque cinquante ans, en 1968, vous commenciez votre carrière en ouvrant une boutique à Hambourg. Est-ce cet anniversaire qui vous a convaincue d’accepter le projet ?
Peut-être, inconsciemment, mais je n’avais absolument pas cette date en tête lorsque j’ai accepté la proposition.

Vous avez débuté la mode par des études textiles : reprenons le fil de votre histoire, bien que vous n’aimiez guère vous retourner sur le passé.
Le fil de l’histoire est une jolie expression ! Aujourd’hui, quand je regarde en arrière, je perçois justement ce fil rouge qui relie tout ce que j’ai pu réaliser. Les matières y occupent une place essentielle. Dans bien d’autres domaines, tout comme pour le Bauhaus qui fête bientôt ses cent ans, ce sont des bases de la modernité. Un socle d’expérimentation et de création. Pour ma part, ces connaissances minutieuses renvoyant à l’origine de l’habillement m’ont aidée à trouver mon propre vocabulaire.

Dans les années 1970 où l’on parlait surtout de stylistes de sexe masculin, était-ce difficile pour une femme de percer ?
Ce n’était pas un obstacle. Ce sont même les tendances d’alors et le style de mes confrères qui imposaient les attitudes aux femmes, qui ont motivé ma propre démarche. Je ne trouvais pas de vêtements pour être acceptée et me faire entendre à l’égal des hommes.

Sobriété, qualité, intemporalité… Vos valeurs sont à l’opposé de la mode actuelle obnubilée par les nouveautés à partager sans délai sur les réseaux sociaux. Quel regard portez-vous sur cet univers, aujourd’hui  ?
Mon intérêt pour la mode ne cessera jamais. Et je ne peux que me réjouir que la communication digitale ait donné l’accès à cet univers, à un public plus large et moins élitiste. En revanche, je ne pense pas que ces nouveaux médias puissent totalement manipuler le goût des personnes. Depuis la fin de la guerre froide, nous enchaînons des progrès à couper le souffle. Nous sommes aujourd’hui dans une période de réajustement. À l’échelle mondiale, de nombreux consommateurs n’ont découvert la mode que très récemment. Ils ont un siècle de connaissances dans le domaine à rattraper ! La globalisation doit, elle aussi, trouver ses repères. Internet est un immense laboratoire qui, lorsque tout se posera quelque peu, pourra devenir une gigantesque vitrine pour des nouveaux designs réellement originaux.

Exposition Jil Sander, du 4 novembre au 6 mai 2018 au Museum Angewandtekunst de Francfort. www.museumangewandtekunst.de.

SHOWstudio – 5 octobre 2017

Lucy Norris reports on the Comme des Garçons show

Hello Kitty hairbrushes, dollies, My Little Ponies and seaside trinkets sat in the hair like hoards of goodies inside a birds nest. The childlike Harajuku aesthetic was Kawakubo engaging with the most Japanese of exports. Postmodern and street style influenced, the seemingly silly and inconsequential were as artful and low brow as graffiti.
Rei Kawakubo doesn’t need a catwalk show comprising of sixty outfits to let you know her proposal for the season ahead. Her S/S 18 collection, entitled ‘Multidimensional Graffiti’, comprised fifteen looks. Business as usual, yes – but with catwalk shows seemingly feeling longer and longer, it’s worth noting what a creative can achieve when pushed to edit. Operating almost like couture, these fifteen looks will also benefit the brand credentials of the label’s diffusion line Play, its fragrance line – and its collaboration with Converse, and the such like. Desire is the name of the game – and Comme des Garçons’s brand family remains desirable because of the power of this show.

A different location for Comme des Garçons this season, with a mad dash across town, we arrived at The Russian Embassy. The show’s first dress was covered with prints from the canvases of 16th century artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo. With faces and features made up of fruit and vegetables, this was surrealism 400 years before surrealism. As the following looks exited, each look was printed with the art of another artist. Some naïve and some kitsch, the soundtrack mirrored the aesthetics by way of an audio collage of taste levels: FKA Twigs (the millennial fashion equivalent to playing Björk at one’s show) was the ‘tasteful’ artist we kept returning to, but she was interjected with the decidedly mass market. However, by the time Lisa Stansfield came on, I was personally all for the beauty of the low-brow. Pannier dresses and Tudor shapes accessorised with sky high Renaissance wigs saw hair almost turned upside down. Hello Kitty hairbrushes, dollies, My Little Ponies and seaside trinkets sat in the hair like hoards of goodies inside a birds nest. The childlike Harajuku aesthetic was Kawakubo engaging with the most Japanese of exports. Postmodern and street style influenced, the seemingly silly and inconsequential were as artful and low brow as graffiti. (With Basqiat’s exhibition currently on show at London’s Barbican Centre, it seems that Kawakubo this season wanted to create her own.) But her ‘graffiti’ wasn’t quite as ‘multidimensional’ as one might think. From the front, the dresses looked 3D voluminous. From the back, some of them were simple shifts with 2D panniers stuck to the sides. A trompe l’oeil trick offered different dimensional perspectives from different angles. Harajuku trinkets also hung from the shoulder line of one PVC red dress that popped so bright, our cameras could barely capture it. As the models lined up at the end, in their bulbous near folkloric get up, they resembled a set of Russian dolls. The Russian Embassy may be architecturally brutalist but inside this room on a Saturday in October it was as decorative as they come.

Another – 5 octobre 2017

Comme des Garçons’ Multi-Dimensional Graffiti

Susannah Frankel takes us on a tour of the Place Vendôme showroom host to Rei Kawakubo’s extraordinary S/S18 collection

In a fashion world dominated by international brands, the Comme des Garçons empire stands alone. Neutral, like Switzerland, from the point of view that the company’s founder, Rei Kawakubo, is universally revered: other designers are more than happy to cite her as inspiration which is unprecedented. Her work – and the work of her protégés Junya Watanabe and Kei Ninomiya for that matter – is anything but neutral, however. Instead, it runs the gamut from breathtakingly beautiful to borderline violent, at times in a single collection, and that says quite something about both the technical skills and emotional power behind it. Comme des Garçons, then, stands outside – and more often than not above – the madding crowd.

As a business structure, too, Comme des Garçons is in a place all of its own. That is nowhere more clear than in the bright, white, Paris showroom where, after the initial impact of the runway presentation, all three collections may be seen up close. So too the commercial lines that make this among the most successful businesses today, from Comme des Garçons’ instantly recognisable tailoring with its sweet Peter Pan collars to Junya Watanabe jeans.

It is not insignificant that the space in question is located on Place Vendôme, among the French capital’s most famous squares and home principally to fine jewellery courtesy of everyone from Dior to Cartier and also to the Paris Ritz. It couldn’t be more bourgeois and, with that in mind, Comme des Garçons’ chosen HQ is as disruptive to the traditional French fashion system as any of the clothes.
At the heart of it all and, quite rightly, in pride of place are Kawakubo’s magnificent structures, majestically in line through the centre of the first, long, narrow room. It is well known now that this designer no longer shows clothing in the conventional understanding of the word on the catwalk but chooses rather to present huge, sculptural pieces – there were fifteen of them in total this time – in exploded silhouettes that positively dwarf their wearer and that speak volumes (no pun intended), season, after season, after season.

In fact, for Spring/Summer 2018, while Kawakubo’s collection was just as big and bold as has come to be expected, it focused as much on surface – on colour and print in particular – as it did outline. Drawing on the work of 12 different artists, from Giuseppe Arcimboldo who, in the 18th century, artfully painted faces out of still lives of vegetables and fruit, to the pixel landscapes of Berlin-based eBoy and the dewy-eyed girls with flowers in their hair that Macoto Takahashi is known for: they gazed almost hypnotically from garments. Colour, coming from a woman who still predominantly favours black, and pattern couldn’t have been more vibrant.
In the Rococo halos of mannequins’ pale frizz, crafted by long-time Comme collaborator Julien d’Ys, were buried pop cultural plastic toys in girlish, fondant-bright shades. Huge tangled clusters of these also hung around necks. Memento mori to lost innocence? Kawakubo said the thematic was “multi-dimensional graffiti”. On the surface there was joy for sure but angel wings on the back of one of two white looks and menacing ravens printed across another carried an undertone of melancholy. Another elaborately pieced and patched tulle design spoke of nothing if not a life in clothes. Frederic Sanchez’ show soundtrack, meanwhile, darted from FKA Twigs to Lisa Stansfield and concluded with the funereal Adagio For Strings by Samuel Barber.

There are only very few designers in history able to make their audience smile and cry in the space of no more than around 15 minutes. Rei Kawakubo is one such.

Business Of Fashion – 5 octobre 2017

A Contrary Spirit at Miu Miu

Miu Miu’s parent company is battling institutional stasis, but Miuccia Prada was fired up by the state of the world, delivering a dialogue of opposites with extraordinary skill.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — There are few designers who appreciate the fact that fashion doesn’t exist in a vacuum as intuitively as Miuccia Prada. A Prada show is an object lesson in context. Everything — from the set to the drinks she serves — amplifies and clarifies the message of the collection. Obviously, music has always played a big part, maybe now more than ever. “Music is what holds everything together,” she agreed on Tuesday after a Miu Miu show where Frederic Sanchez, her longtime sonic collaborator, created a soundtrack that was so vivid it was almost another character on the catwalk. A list of the artists tells the story, among them, the Pixies, Bikini Kill, the Breeders and a finale tracked by the Ramones’ version of « Baby, I Love You » (chosen by Katie Grand, another longtime Prada collaborator, for her wedding). Sanchez’s picks had a hard, aggressive edge which took a few cues from the music he used for Prada’s signature collection in Milan.

Miuccia said she had two things in mind: “the girl” (which was why she worked so hard on the casting for this show – she saw a thousand models!), and the contrary spirit in which Miu Miu originally launched nearly 25 years ago. “The freedom I felt at the beginning,” she called it. In those days, Prada was a company whose clothes dazzlingly defied conventional notions of taste and propriety. Now it’s a massive global brand battling institutional stasis. But in her last few collections, there has been a pervasive sense of Miuccia Prada kicking against the pricks. It was strong in Miu Miu, in the way that an oversized distressed leather coat wrapped a white lace shift; in the strange granny crochet, with its undercurrent of purity defiled; in the confrontational oddities that rendered beauty redundant, or at least, as Miuccia said, “make it possible in real life, not just for the limousine or the hotel” (need to think about that one!).

Man tailoring was matched to fabulous graphic knits. Almost everything was veiled in a sheer overlay, which sometimes looked pure, and other times prurient. There’s a dialogue of opposites in there that Prada has always managed to conduct with extraordinary skill: prurience and propriety, restraint and release, the cerebral locking horns with the physical. Footwear flat and functional. Heads bound. Bodies primed for action. What is new now is that Miuccia is fired up by the state of the world. Back to that soundtrack: rough, tough, shreddingly dismissive of male crap. Not quite clothes to match just yet. But wait.

Dazed DIgital – 1er octobre 2017

Comme des Garçons tags PFW with multidimensional graffiti

For SS18, Rei Kawakubo enlisted the work of nine artists from the 16th century to today to illustrate the sculptural looks

There are very few designers in the world who can make you forget the fact you haven’t had a proper night’s sleep in several weeks (and that it shows), or that you’ve suddenly come down with the flu (hi everyone). Even if you’re feeling your best, it’s rare to have your attention captivated so fully for 20 minutes that your mouth is hanging open. Rei Kawakubo is one of those designers, and yesterday in Paris her Comme des Garçons show was even more proof of that fact. As if you needed it. Here’s what went down.

THE SHOW WAS HELD AT THE RUSSIAN EMBASSY
…in a long hall with polished wooden floors and ornamental glass panels hanging from the ceiling. (Also, appropriately I think I spotted Gosha Rubchinskiy pre-show, not far from a giant unfurled Russian flag). The white runway was raised in a zig-zag across the room, and models stepped out and walked its length one at a time.

REI’S WORDS OF THE SEASON WERE MULTIDIMENSIONAL GRAFFITI
Which might help to explain why the collection mashed up colourful art/illustrations with the sculptural looks that are tradition at Comme des Garçons. This wasn’t as basic as a tag you might find on the side of a bus shelter though, Kawakubo’s graffiti was of course much more conceptual – her silhouettes exploded outwards and had holes which revealed many layers of different fabrics. It was like the material version of when a wall is coated with different artists’ work – a mosaic of colours and styles.

IT FEATURED THE WORK OF NINE ARTISTS
From 16th century Italian Giuseppe Arcimboldo, whose fruit face portraits appeared on the first and fifth looks, to E-Boy whose pixel landscapes cropped up on look twelve. The florals were courtesy of Dutch artist Abraham Mignon and as for the giant anime-looking girl with glinting eyes? The work of Japanese-born Macoto Takahashi. The headpieces by Julien d’Ys, works of art in themselves, were made up of items that looked like the kitschy trappings of girlhood like toys, cupcake iPhone cases, kawaii Hello Kitty dolls and plastic rings.

THE SHOES WERE NIKES… WITH HEELS
Continuing Nike’s fruitful partnership with CdG, this season saw models wear Nike shoes – or rather, the hollow shell of Nike boxing shoes, which were placed over the top of pair of clog-like heels. They came in colour combinations of blue and white, green and white, and, naturally, black.

THE MUSIC WAS TRENDY, TACKY, SAD AND BRILLIANT
FKA twigs blended into this year’s smash dance hit “Falling” by Alesso, and then, even more unexpectedly, “Closer” by 80s pop singer Lisa Stansfield. It all concluded with “Adagio for Strings” – a version of the famous piece written by Samuel Barber conducted by André Previn, and taken from the soundtrack of David Lynch’s The Elephant Man. Someone wrote a book about how this is “the saddest music ever written” – and you would have had to be made of pretty strong stuff not to have been moved as the song swelled and the models filed back out onto the runway for the finale. There was something about the combination of the childlike, girlish accessories with the heart-wrenching music that was extremely affecting – beyond the graffiti byline, it felt like Kawakubo was addressing very human ideas of childhood innocence, lost youth and the passage of time.

Business Of Fashion – 1er octobre 2017

Comme des Garçons’ Monument to Irrevocable Loss

Just as girlhood is an inevitable prelude to lost innocence, Rei Kawakubo’s collection seemed to recognize another human inevitability, the most inescapable of all.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Before the Comme des Garçons exhibition opened at the Metropolitan Museum in New York in May, Rei Kawakubo seemed convinced that no one would show up. Hundreds of thousands of visitors begged to differ. For her first women’s presentation since the epochal Met event, Kawakubo chose to show in the austere grandeur of the Russian Embassy. She kept the raised catwalk from last time, so everyone got a good look. And she offered a collection which could hardly disappoint any of the vast audience who got acquainted with her work through the exhibition in New York. It was essential Comme in its defiance of fashion orthodoxy. The proportions challenged conventional notions of utility. Sleeves fell to the floor, hips were wider than any door. One bouclé coat-based ensemble was a full five feet wide. Time and space elided in the 16 looks, dressed with hair by Julien D’Ys that married Africa and the Middle Ages, collaged with work by eleven artists, from Renaissance master of illusion Arcimboldo and Zen monk Sesson Shukei, also from the 16th century, to contemporary outsider artist Anne Grgich and cyber star E-Boy. Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack matched them with eleven snippets of music, all of them by young women.

It was tempting to attach some significance to this last point, because the collection did seem to be “about” girlhood, insofar as anything Kawakubo does lends itself to such direct interpretation. There were cartoons, and flowers, and maybe a little girl’s dream of a frilly princess something or other. Or might it even be a wedding dress? D’Ys compared some of his hairstyles to nests. They were filled with the detritus of Japanese kawaii culture, the cuteness that bequeathed us Hello Kitty. She was there, in the nest, along with dozens of girlish trinkets and plastic doodads. One of the eleven artists was Macoto Takahashi, who became famous in the 60s for his proto-manga paintings of dewy young girls with huge starry eyes. You could imagine them hoarding the stuff that decorated Kawakubo’s clothes.

There was something immensely sad in that. Just as girlhood is an inevitable prelude to lost innocence, Kawakubo’s collection seemed to recognize another human inevitability, the most inescapable of all. The clothes were monumental, but the monument was to irrevocable loss. Over all the kawaii, there hovered a big black raven. One of the most striking pieces looked to be composed of a huge, crushed mass of prettiness, petticoats and lingerie, draped over a bodysuit of the same. The model posed coquettishly on the catwalk, a cliché you’d never expect to see at CDG. But the act was so deliberate it felt like a direction. “Be pretty now.” Because it won’t – it can’t – last.

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Business Of Fashion – 25 septembre 2017

Marni’s Spin Cycle

There was discipline in the overpieces that held volumes in check, but Francisco Risso was more engaged by chaos, dissecting design with glee.

If you include menswear and pre-fall, the collection Francisco Risso showed on Sunday morning was his fifth for Marni, and what’s become crystal clear is that you don’t spend all that time at Prada without learning how to spin the kind of yarn that encompasses worlds. Risso’s was all about his dream of a girl on a skateboard surfing through a wardrobe of the ages, becoming laden with clothes from different eras as she went, couture structure mashed with flapper languor. It was the kind of cinematic trope that raised the roof in madcap chase scenes in silent movies (or even « The Naked Gun »), and it applied equally to the playful pile-up that Risso catapulted onto his catwalk.

He called his collection Treasure Hunt, describing it as “a game for adults”, comparing his woman to an archeologist examining her finds through a wide-angle lens to magnify the pieces. The clothes were BIG, classic couture shapes, waists, hips and full skirts, expanded to surreal proportions. “New Dada,” said Risso, referring to the movement that gleefully up-ended art world orthodoxy. And glee was the driving force that motivated his own dissection of design. It was almost as though in his own furious scavenging through trunks of clothing, he hadn’t had time to complete anything. hems and seams were unfinished, toiles and fabrics pieced together pell-mell, pearls and shiny things and faces by artist David Salle applied as decoration. There was discipline in the overpieces, like old-school one-piece bathing suits, that held volumes in check, but Risso was more engaged by chaos. That’s where he said he found real beauty: “Between cacophony and charm”. There was plenty of both in the collection. And if Risso put Marni on spin cycle, you couldn’t imagine anyone but Frederic Sanchez supplying the overpowering aural complement: he sent a crazy mash-up of the Cramps’ rockabilly, Yma Sumac’s pagan shrieks and Joe Meek’s extra-terrestrial twang racing around the room in a mind-boggling 360-degree rampage. It was the season’s finest cacophony.

Business Of Fashion – 25 septembre 2017

A Textbook Update of Missoni

The collection was a reminder of just how successfully Angela Missoni has managed to keep her family business humming well into its eighth decade.

Angela Missoni took over the creative direction of the family brand 20 years ago, so there’s been a bit of a celebration going on in Milan. Vogue Italia made a nice little supplement to mark her anniversary, and Missoni’s Spring/Summer 2018 show became the excuse for an evening-long wingding, from catwalk to dinner to after-party dancefloor. You needed to bear that in mind when you sat down to reflect on the real heart of it all, the clothes that Angela showed.

From the moment Kiki Willems stepped out in a sparkly, sheer slip dress, it was clear that Missoni had gone to another place. Head Space! Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack was a flibbertigibbet rampage through dance tracks we knew and loved in the Second Summer of Love, and the girls walked in floaty, flighty, lacy, languidly clingy and oh-so-sheer bodycon confections that effortlessly evoked saucer-eyed sweethearts at the Café del Mar. “These are the kids I want to have at my party,” said Angela. It was gauzily gorgeous wish fulfilment, it was an education in Missoni’s ability to turn knitwear into gossamer, but it didn’t do an awful lot towards advancing Missoni’s claim on the everyday.

Fortunately, this was also the season when Missoni launched its women’s and men’s collections simultaneously. There were odd moments when the menswear embraced the sheerness of the women’s clothing, but otherwise, it was a textbook update of the brand’s grasp of colour and pattern. The standouts were the patchwork sweaters, but the ingenious, seductive layering of stripes, plaids, chevrons, and warping test patterns was a reminder of just how successfully Angela Missoni has managed to keep her family business humming well into its eighth decade.

Le Monde – 22 septembre 2017

Fashion week : La renaissance milanaise

Etat de grâce chez les créateurs à Milan, qui composent un vestiaire accessible sans renoncer à leur flamboyance baroque.

Par Carine Bizet

Les vertus commerciales de la mode italienne, qui ont enrichi les designers et fait de Milan un grand acteur financier du secteur, ont aussi longtemps englué la fashion week locale dans un classicisme un peu trop confortable. Mais, ces trois dernières années, les choses ont lentement commencé à bouger. Les voix se multiplient pour défendre une créativité plus originale et personnelle, une féminité plus complexe et sensible. Bonne nouvelle, ça se vend.

Aujourd’hui, le fossé est plus évident que jamais entre ces griffes novatrices et celles qui restent attachées à d’anciennes formules, plus orientées vers le produit. D’autant que la sainte patronne de la créativité italienne, Miuccia Prada, est en grande forme. Elle a confié le décor de son défilé à huit artistes féminines : Brigid Elva, Joëlle Jones, Stellar Leuna, Giuliana Maldini, Natsume Ono, Emma Rios, Trina Robbins, Fiona Staples, auxquelles s’ajoutent les archives de Tarpe Mills, créatrice de la première femme super-héros. Elles ont habillé le lieu de ­portraits de femmes fortes et ­glamour, entre le comics à ­l’américaine et le manga. La collection envoie sur le podium une bande de filles cool, féminines et dures à la fois, une vraie démonstration de style.

Les grands manteaux de la bourgeoise chic fusionnent avec les perfectos, avec des faux plis marqués en blanc, des pardessus en tweed rehaussé de motifs tigre ou panthère, des vestes cubiques habillées de clous, des trenchs reprenant les imprimés des murs. Les beautés punk-rock qui les portent aiment autant les shorts rayés avec des chaussettes rétro que les sur-robes de poupée déglinguée passées sur un jean noir. La bande-son qui tangue entre énergie punk et mélancolie schizophrène est signée Frédéric ­Sanchez, et elle est aussi magistrale que la collection. Tout en nuances ou en dérapages contrôlés, ce vestiaire ultra-désirable fait l’unanimité.

British Vogue – 22 septembre 2017

How To Channel The Spirit Of Prada SS18

Prada spring/summer 2018 was « a white canvas filled with ideas », said the renowned designer.
Here, we examine how to channel them.

by OLIVIA SINGER

INDIGITAL
There are few designers who can present diverse eclecticism with such seamless allure as Miuccia Prada, nor any who set the tone for the seasons to come just like she does. It is for these reasons that the Prada show is one of the most hotly anticipated of the season: she is fashion’s favourite genius, offering up collections that are simultaneously avant-garde in their conception, covetable on the shop floor, and revered by reviewers, customers, and fellow designers alike. “Basically it was a white canvas filled with ideas,” she said backstage after this mash-up collection of hits. Essentially, we all want to be a bit more Prada – and so, this season, here’s how.

Eclecticism is key
Over the past couple of years, there has been a new trend for eclecticism – not just on the runways, but in the real-life wardrobes of women themselves. Wearing full look is out: instead, constructing your daily outfit from an assortment of different designers, different genres, different eras, is the modern way to dress. “I was really interested in somebody who wants to be active and present nowadays – I don’t want to say how they should dress, but how they should be free to experiment,” said Mrs Prada backstage after the show. Here, studded sandals were teamed with satin bustiers layered over pinstripe shirting; pretty, puff-sleeved dresses worn over workwear trousers; Herringbone jackets given leopard-print lapels; even flared, Fifties skirts made the occasional appearance (in a thoroughly psychobilly fashion). It was diverse, to say the least – and thoroughly shoppable, although “I don’t want to be judged by sales,” she laughed. “My life is so much more important than sales.”

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Get on Spotify
While talking about the soundtrack to a collection can often be a handy way to sidestep discussion of the clothes, the music that accompanies Miuccia Prada’s runways are routinely as considered as the looks she sends out. This time, the likes of Lana del Rey, Nirvana, Nina Simone, Sinead O’Connor, Suzanne Vega, The Cure, PJ Harvey and L7 all made notable sonic appearances in a poetic cross-genre medley. “They are different people, and each one has their own voice,” she said. This was a soundtrack for a generation who curate Spotify playlists rather than put on records, and it was brilliant. “It was a little bit like the bootleg that you might get in a certain genre of movie,” said Frédéric Sanchez, the composer behind the music. “I think there is something in the soundtrack that shows all these different women, each who represent something so strong in a certain moment of time.” And it was their combined eclecticism that made this music feel so thoroughly contemporary, so authentically 2017.

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Be strong (particularly right now)
“I want women to be strong because still there is so much against us. So we need a lot of cleverness, intelligence, and strength… particularly now,” Mrs Prada continued – and these women were: they were punk, wearing mish-mash combinations of studs and animal print, sometimes the pieces themselves looking like two distinct personas spliced together. There was a confidence in such an approach that was distinctly Mrs Prada – remember that John Waters Miu Miu collection? – but it felt fresh and relevant, particularly when teamed with bare faces and gamine haircuts (how many models got a Guido chop specially for the occasion is yet to be noted, but it looks like plenty).

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Reference… yourself
Souped-up versions of pre-existing pointy shoes; the same, sportif sock that Prada debuted for Resort 2018; the nylon fabric that propelled this brand to the forefront of fashion: this was a collection that riffed on some former offerings – after all, if everyone else is doing it, why shouldn’t she? Those who have noted the trend for transparency that has swept the spring/summer 2018 shows might remember that it was the Prada Resort show that first introduced the filmy fabrications now appearing on every runway – because, where Mrs Prada goes, the rest are sure to follow. It won’t be until next season that we see the impact of this collection, but it’s sure to make a mark.

Dazed and Confused – 22 septembre 2017

Prada channels teen angst and rebellious girl power

WHAT WENT DOWN
With an angsty remix of Lana Del Rey, Nina Simone and Nirvana as the soundtrack, the show space was transformed by the work of nine female artists. When it comes to comic books, women can seem truly two dimensional. Not so in the Prada universe, as last night’s SS18 womenswear show proved. Here’s what went down.

THE SET CONTINUED THE THEME OF MENSWEAR
Not surprisingly considering the SS18 menswear set this summer, the showspace was transformed with comic book prints. This time, however, they depicted different facets of women – from the blunt-fringed teen in her bedroom with her guitar (and a Black Flag sticker on the dresser) to a 40s-era illustration of a red-head knocking a man down with a single punch. Girl power.

THE SOUNDTRACK WAS ANGSTY AND AMAZING
No, but seriously – we’re talking Lana Del Rey’s “Video Games” meets Nirvana’s “I Hate Myself and Want to Die”, which I specifically remember downloading as a tween and playing on repeat so my emotional depth would be displayed to the world via my MSN. Cringe aside, Frédéric Sanchez’s mix for this season was beyond. PJ Harvey, loads of The Cure, Kim Deal, NINA SIMONE! It was a rundown of outsider anthems from different eras, and it was brilliant accompaniment to the collection.

THERE WAS A COLLABORATION WITH NINE FEMALE COMIC ARTISTS
The comic prints weren’t just on the walls – they also appeared in the collection, on everything from bags and shirts to coats and earrings, in what was a collaboration with a grand total of nine female artists. We’re not talking superheroes in impractically small clothes, or anxious Lichtenstein heroines pining over a man. From young talent to old legends, Prada said she was inspired by “how spirited (the artists) were and how they captured women in a very real way”. To read all about ‘em, head here.

THERE WERE LOADS OF CONTRADICTIONS
And, on a related note, lots of trousers. (That might not sound like a big deal, but Mrs P is famed for her love of skirts – she’s done whole collections with no trousers at all). Here they sometimes came with typically feminine, floral dresses or tops overlaid, like walking comments on the duality of women. Other times that contrast was channeled in the mixing of those same tops with shirts printed with black spiders.

YOUR STUDDED BELT IS BACK
Rejoice, ex-emos – that staple is making a return. The subculture nods didn’t stop there – in what felt like an exploration of the symbols of female rebellion, there was leopard print, studs, and a lot of that classic Hot Topic combination of black and red, too. Also, the coats added a distinct Teddy Girls vibe, like modern versions of those captured in the late Ken Russell’s photo series in 50s London.

MIUCCIA PRADA TALKED ABOUT FEMALE STRENGTH
“I want women to be strong because there is still so much against us. I think that we need a lot of cleverness and intelligence and strength,” the designer said post-show – adding that these qualities are needed now more than ever. And to a rather blunt question from someone about how the business was going, she certainly had the last word. “Actually, I don’t like to be judged by sales – my life is much more important than sales.”

Business Of Fashion – 22 septembre 2017

A Hunger for Intensity at Prada

Miuccia Prada usually questions orthodoxy in a passive aggressive way, but this collection was infected with a no-nonsense grunge-y sensibility of resistance.

BY TIM BLANKS

The young people Miuccia Prada spends time with believe there’s a war coming. Maybe that prospect infected her collection. “We are the last generation without a war,” she declared. MILITANT was her mot de jour, “not necessarily just for women but in general”. It translated into clothes that were fierce and graphic, partly due to Prada’s use of the work of female cartoonists from the last few decades, but also down to a no-nonsense grunge-y sensibility of resistance.

“I love those lesbians,” photographer Nan Goldin enthused to Prada after the show. That was how she interpreted the collection’s tough studded-sandal, sleeveless-jacket, shorts’n’tweed-coat union of male and female. Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack worked an entire aural spectrum of the idea, from the melancholic sweetness of Suzanne Vega and Jimmy Scott’s astounding cover of « Nothing Compares 2U » to the spitting-tacks anger of riot grrrls L-7 and their guru Kurt Cobain. It was hard to miss the allusions to Cobain in the vintage-y floral dresses worn over pants.

If the musical accompaniment acknowledged vulnerability as well as female fury, the women in the cartoons that lined the wall and covered Prada’s clothes were fighters. Angela Davis was one of them. And I’d swear I saw Wonder Woman, though Miuccia disputed that. She would rather her women be distinctly un-super. “I wanted to see their human, simple, underestimated side,” she insisted.

But her collection wasn’t about humility (hence Angela Davis). Rather, there was a sense of the strength that comes through endurance. The youth cult subtext that has been a rich seam of inspiration for Prada in the past was once again mined for pieces that were here suggestive of rockabilly dress-up. The leopard print was this season’s deliberate engagement with a fashion element Prada dislikes. (It often works out very well for her when she utilizes something she despises, suede being a case in point.)

The use of the print underscored the particular, peculiar hybrid of past, present and future that is her design signature. The full skirt under the sleeveless jacket, the stripey shorts and the sleeveless top, the eerie palest pink twinset over a matching skirt were the kind of outfits that would slot effortlessly into a timeless David Lynch fantasia, because, like Lynch, questioning orthodoxy is what Miuccia Prada does best. She’s usually done it in a passive-aggressive way, but that trait didn’t seem so much in evidence on Thursday night. Instead, the collection she showed made you hunger for her next engagement. I predict a steady pre-war intensification.

Business Of Fashion – 19 septembre 2017

Music is the Muse at Erdem

Inspired by a dream of Queen Elizabeth II dancing to the Duke Ellington at the Cotton Club in Harlem, the collection was a rich hybridisation of couture and a flapper’s delight.

BY TIM BLANKS

LONDON, United Kingdom — For the first time in his career, Erdem Moralioglu let music be the muse for a collection. And oh! what music! The romantic, melancholic mood of « The Queen’s Suite » made it sound like it could have been written specially for the designer. In actual fact, it was composed by the bandleader Duke Ellington for Elizabeth II after the pair met at a performance in Leeds in 1958. “I’m going to write something for you,” he told the young Queen, so impressed was he by her love of jazz. “I’ll be listening,” came her pert reply. Two recordings were made of the suite, one for him, one for her, both subsequently lost to the world until his disc was located in the Smithsonian.

Such a story of two worlds intimately connecting across a social and cultural divide was catnip for Erdem. While he was designing his collection, he took the story a step further, dreaming of Elizabeth dancing to the Duke at the Cotton Club in Harlem, Dorothy Dandridge or Billie Holiday on the mike. It was a gorgeous conceit. The set for his show was an afterhours mirage of just such a place, the clothes a rich hybridisation of Norman Hartnell’s puffball couture and the sensuous, satiny dresses of the Cotton Club’s chanteuses.

At times, it bordered on the surreal, as with the cardigan decorously buttoned around the throat but skewed furiously sideways over a bra and bared midriff, with a princess-y dance skirt in a washed floral print floating genteelly below. At other times, it made perfect sense, like a swirl of lilac chiffon, its embroidery delicate, almost Japanese. The key was always movement, the young Queen dancing while the big band played, tulle petticoats flaring the hems of her dress as she twirled. There were pieces that mixed vermilion fringing and silver tinsel, a flapper’s delight.

“Neon pastels” was Erdem’s own description of the colour palette. If there was something vaguely hallucinatory about the intensity of emerald green brocades or shimmering pink moirés, he also offered a reality check in the form of Prince of Wales plaids: a smart tailored jacket, a pantsuit, a midcalf coatdress. The relative sanity of such items was a reminder that Erdem’s mass-market collection for H&M launches in November. But even here, hems were frayed, coats and jackets randomly studded with encrustations of embroidery. It’s easy to see why Erdem is so fascinated with the Queen’s wardrobe. Her dressing is codified. So is his. But her codes exalt propriety, his subtly unhinge it. That has always been his gleeful challenge, and he rose to it yet again on Monday. Next time, how about a look at Princess Margaret? The fun never stops with that one.

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Vogue Runway – 19 septembre 2017

The affection for Her Majesty the Queen among her British subjects knows no bounds. Nearly 65 years after ascending the throne in 1953, she’s had quite a year. At the age of 91, she has visited children who were terribly injured in the Manchester suicide bombing and the residents and families of the people of many cultures who died in the Grenfell Tower disaster in London. Now, curiosity about Elizabeth II as a human being—rather than a stiff royal cipher—is at an all-time high. Nothing illustrates that better than the Golden Globes–sweeping success of Netflix’s epic The Crown. Claire Foy plays Elizabeth from the time of her coronation (at the age of 25) on. This summer, Erdem Moralıoğlu found his own extraordinary path into expressing his admiration for the queen while researching her clothes at Windsor Castle (no less). He conducted his research under the guidance of Caroline de Guitaut, the senior curator of decorative arts of the Royal Collection. There, he made a discovery which blew his mind, kindling a theme for a beautiful collection based on the 1950s that touched on a personal connection to Black-American culture in the young queen’s life. “It felt kind of important at a weird time like this,” said the designer. “The exchange between two worlds felt really beautiful.”

Erdem had discovered that Elizabeth enjoyed jazz and dancing when she was young, and that she had met Duke Ellington in 1958 at a royal command performance. “It was at a theater in Leeds,” he said, pointing out a photo of the queen—wearing a tiara, a cream brocade Norman Hartnell evening gown, and white opera gloves—meeting the duke of jazz in a reception line. Ellington was so taken, he composed a piece for her called “Queen’s Suite.” “She had one record of it and he the other, which got lost in the Smithsonian until 2012. It’s sort of a piece of love poetry, really,” Erdem reflected. “She wrote him a note where she said, ‘I’ll be listening.’”
After absorbing that information, he made the leap to Harlem in the 1950s, designing into the fantasy that the young royal might have visited the Cotton Club to watch Dorothy Dandridge, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald perform. It made for quite gorgeous fashion, a context in which to show diverse beauty and an evocative set furnished as a glamorous Harlem Renaissance–era jazz club.
There were brocade coats—fitted in front, with Watteau swinging in back—and variations on prim checked tailored coats. Ribbons inspired by royal decorations became fastenings on bustier dresses or shoulder-bows. Pearl and gold embroideries of leeks and flowers imitated the symbols Hartnell planted in the queen’s coronation gown. The sinuous ’30s- and ’40s-chic dresses of the Cotton Club’s great singers contrasted with balloon-skirted ballgowns (an emerging trend of the season, there). Will the queen be amused? She should be. It was a sincere tribute to a woman who has lived a life dedicated to duty and bringing people together. And it’s nice to know she’s had some fun along the way.

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Dior Homme – Musique originale et sound design – Juillet 2017









Dazed – 29 juin 2017

The menswear shows have wrapped, and after a journey from London to Florence, then Milan and finally Paris, it’s time to reflect on the season that was. While there were those which stunned thanks to their sets (Rick Owens’ towering scaffolding springs to mind), entertained with performance (the circus troupe Vivienne Westwood brought to town) and joined fashion and art together in unexpected collaborations (shout out to Jenny Holzer x Off-White) there was one show that was particularly notable for the immediate effect of sheer joy felt by its audience: Comme des Garçons Homme Plus.

A bit of context: This was Rei Kawakubo’s first show since the monumental Met Gala, where the elusive designer gave a few rare press interviews and even told Lynn Yaeger she wasn’t actually going to show up. (She did, in a slightly fancier version of her standard Lewis Leathers biker, black skirt and trainers uniform). Of course, Comme was already a fashion and business behemoth, but a Met retrospective is another thing entirely; the hundreds of thousands of public visitors standing in line is a pretty different stage for Kawakubo’s work than her intimate fashion shows. As for the show itself, once the initially reluctant designer had been talked into doing it, she went all out – even creating an 116,000 square foot mock-up of the space in Tokyo. If there was ever a time that the already mysterious Kawakubo seemed even more like a deeply serious, incomprehensible genius, this was it.

So, entering the grand Salle Wagram that made up the Comme menswear show space, it’s safe to say the audience was probably expecting something thought provoking, loftily conceptual, or even sombre. After all, the last few Comme menswear shows have explored ideas including boyhood, ‘the armour of peace’, and the emperor’s new clothes – this season has the added backdrop of a world which feels like it’s inching towards crisis, as exemplified by the hot new trend of bomb detector dogs outside shows. Instead, as the lights went down, something else happened entirely: the raised, square catwalk was lit with a myriad of swirling, technicoloured spotlights, the thumpingly loud soundtrack kicked in, and the young gang of models bounced up onto the stage with more energy than had been seen all month.

Dressed in a wild, hyper-saturated patchwork of colour, pattern, texture and print, they danced, paced, vogued, threw poses. They wore jackets that clashed red Flinstones-esque faux fur with colourful florals and rainbow lurex. Some looks were almost entirely constructed of thousands upon thousands of shimmering sequins which reflected the bouncing lights, while the shoes on models’ feet (limited edition Nike 180s) seemed to glow neon as if under an ultraviolet light. At points looking like teenage boys dancing clumsily at their first party, there was something seriously charming about the way the models moved around the space.

Sculptor Mona Luison (who worked on a capsule collection of jewellery in 2011 with Comme called Love Me Tender) was invited back to create a series of jackets. Imagine Louise Bourgeois let loose on a toy box after a strong dose of acid: rubber dinosaurs with rabbit faces and dolls with Barbie limbs extending out of their eye sockets all protruded from the fabric. “We spoke about inside/outside, explosion, strangeness, toys, dolls…” the artist said of the creative process, adding that being at the show (her first) was “amazing”. “I was very pleased to see such good spirits, I loved being in that place at that moment. It was a great privilege for me to work on the collection.”

“Imagine Louise Bourgeois let loose on a toy box after a strong dose of acid: rubber dinosaurs with rabbit faces, dolls with Barbie limbs extending out of their eye sockets”
For the energising soundtrack, long-term Comme collaborator Frédéric Sanchez had one word as his starting point. “I don’t really get briefs, but this time there was one,” he shared over the phone from his Paris studio. “Rei was thinking of disco.” He wasn’t going to focus on the past though – “it was not the idea to play Gloria Gaynor or Donna Summer” – but instead explore the core of the word itself. “What is everything you can put into a word like this to make it extreme? So I mixed all these tracks in a frenetic way with this idea of having this imaginary sort of club, and this moment where everything is mixed up in your head. A sort of extreme disco mix – so is it disco, is it rave?”

It certainly did the job, with the breakneck BPM leaving the audience bobbing up and down in their seats (Tyga, sitting in the front row, looked thrilled). After the show, the name for the collection was declared to be ‘what’s on the inside matters’ – almost all of the crazily colourful jackets were in fact worn inside out, so it was their linings the audience had been seeing. Kind of a funny phrase when you consider we’re talking about fashion, but nevertheless – the effect of the show was notable and immediate: it made people happy. Like the hours spent losing yourself on the dancefloor of an amazing club, it was a moment that got as close to euphoric escapism as fashion can manage. Disco died because it became formulaic, predictable and tired. Despite the blockbuster exhibition and the accompanying red carpet spectacle, Rei’s catwalk party proved that there’s no danger of that happening to Comme.

Dior Homme Summer 2018 Show – Savoir Faire – Composition originale

Dior Homme Summer 2018 Show – Composition originale

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Prada Men Spring 2018 fashion show video – Composition originale

Salvatore Ferragamo Men Spring 2018 fashion show video – Composition originale

Ports 1961 Men Spring 2018 fashion show video – Composition originale

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MSGM Men Spring 2018 fashion show video – Composition originale

Dazed – 24 juin 2017

Kris Van Assche is still having fun after a decade at Dior

This year, Belgian designer Kris Van Assche celebrates a decade at the helm of Dior Homme. Even he can’t quite believe it’s been that long – “It’s gone really quickly!” he exclaims from his atelier at 3 Rue de Marignan, the afternoon before his SS18 show. Originally arriving at the house in 2000 with Hedi Slimane (who he assisted at Yves Saint Laurent), he left to start his own independent label in 2004. When Slimane exited three years later he returned, dividing his week between the two brands until 2015, when he decided to focus on Dior full time. “It became super exciting for me when I had to quit my own label. It really allowed for me to put much more of myself here,” he says. “I’ve kind of reinvented my role now, so it’s a whole new adventure.”

That new adventure hasn’t exactly been low profile, thanks to a list of headline-making campaign stars. As well as younger creative talents including A$AP Rocky, The xx’s Oliver Sim and Manchester By The Sea actor Lucas Hedges, there was Larry Clark, Boy George, and most recently Depeche Mode’s Dave Gahan, revealed only last week. While the casting perfectly brings together both the cult and current, what’s perhaps been most brilliant is the unexpected nature of the protagonists: even Van Assche thought it would “for sure be a no” from the 74-year-old Clark, best known for seminal 1995 film Kids, and photobooks like Tulsa and Teenage Lust. “I’ve been very lucky,” admits the designer happily. Clark even made a short film for the house, and despite their wildly different backgrounds, each campaign star has felt unshakably authentic as a figurehead; they’ve been chosen out of a genuine respect for their work as opposed an attempt to tap into a trend or hit up the latest social media influencer.

Recent collections have been similarly high voltage, blending dark but impeccable tailoring with a subcultural and street edge. There was last season’s ‘HarDior’ collection, which saw a hardcore techno raver influence that had hints of Belgium’s gabber music fans. Then there was the punkish, gothic SS17 collection, which featured bondage straps, skull motifs, and Frankenstein-like red stitching. The season before that, 80s New Wave and 90s skaters were a key reference point, and models wore their hair in emo fringes. To top it all off, their fingernails were painted with black polish. “I am interested in a synthesis of generations and filtering subcultures through my own lens to tell a new story,” Van Assche has said.

“It became super exciting for me when I had to quit my own label. It really allowed for me to put much more of myself here” – Kris Van Assche

His SS18 show yesterday, was another exploration of youth culture through the lens of Dior’s longstanding heritage, as models marched out onto a turf runway to a jarring mix which veered between outsider anthems like Radiohead’s “Creep”, REM’s “Losing My Religion” and Depeche Mode’s “Enjoy the Silence”. Above them hung black streams of tinsel, which looked like the tape you’d find coiled in cassettes.

The collection was divided into two parts – first up was a desire to “re-think and re-work the DNA of the brand”: the black suit and the white shirt. “How can we re-make that and deconstruct it for the future?” was the question Van Assche posed. The answer was to approach the suit in what he called a “radical” new way: the first silhouettes were a menswear take on Christian Dior’s classic Bar silhouette for women while the backs of jackets were cut away to reveal bondage-like straps which bisected the t-shirts beneath. Some pieces saw sleeves chopped off entirely to become scarves wrapped around the neck, and trousers were blown up into raver-wide, JNCO-like proportions, or else replaced by super short shorts. In a direct tribute to the house, the address of the Rue de Marignan atelier appeared prominently, featuring on bags, tops, shirts, pins and more.

But there was also an ode to American adolescence – with varsity jackets and prints, a heavy sportswear theme, and what Van Assche said was a tribute to the all American prom night – when young men might put on their first suit. “For me it’s just youth culture, street culture,” he noted of the Stateside references – which have also been a famous source of inspiration for fellow Belgian, Raf Simons. “When I was 15 we all looked at America for that. Some of those memories come back… but now that street culture is everywhere, it’s worldwide.” One phrase came splashed across multiple pieces: “LATE NIGHT SUMMER”. “I really wanted to evoke when you get to stay out the whole night for the first time,” he says. “The sky’s the limit – having beers, your first boyfriend or girlfriend, that idea of becoming aware that the way you dress is going to help you socialise and exist, really.”

Trainers were matched with every look – like when teenage boys kick off their school shoes as soon as the bell rings and put on their freshest pair of sneakers. There was also a collaboration with artist Francois Bard, whose work depicts 21st century scenes – men in caps, trainers and hoodies – in fine art oil paintings. Similar to Van Assche’s own work, his practice mixes the contemporary and street with elevated, precisely honed techniques. The designer even has some of Bard’s pieces at home. “I think he has a very traditional way of portraying something very modern, so I very much like his work,” he praises. Beneath it all was an exploration of the line between boyishness and manhood, those moments young men start to discover their style, begin to dress with intent: “The idea of these guys at college… how do they enter into this process of seduction or being more sexy? By cutting off their sleeves, making their own necklaces… but with little skulls because of course they’re still tough.”

While some designers might be getting restless after such a long time, Van Assche seems perfectly content. The rest of the industry, it should be noted, appears to be in a near-constant state of flux, with new moves announced regularly and one designer – Justin O’Shea, hired at Brioni – only lasting a single season in his new job. “It feels like I’m growing into a new chapter, it doesn’t really feel like I’ve been doing the same thing for 10 years,” Van Assche says. He cites the decision to shake up the campaign team and start working with David Sims as an example – “I’m reinventing it because I want to change it on a high. I don’t want to get into a comfort zone.” That’s the risk of working in a big house, he admits: “You know the expectations, you know what will sell, what people will like. But in the end I really realised with my own label – I’m not having enough fun with this. So I had to clean everything out and I started having more fun here.” It’s certainly paying off.

Business Of Fashion – 24 juin 2017

Teenage Nights at Dior Homme

By Tim Blanks

The power of smell is such that when the first astronauts went into space, they carried vials of different scents as reassuring reminders of Planet Earth. The one that spoke most to happy memories was apparently fresh grass. It certainly worked that way for Kris Van Assche, whose latest show for Dior Homme, Late Night Summer was primed with his recollections of adolescence and staged on a carpet of grass that smelled almost overpoweringly summery.

The massive curtains of dark tape that hung above it might have been an abstract rendition of a night sky, but I thought of cassette tape too, and teenage boys like Assche slaving over compilations for their Walkmans. Frederic Sanchez struck all the right notes with his soundtrack: Radiohead’s Creep, Depeche’s Enjoy the Silence, REM’s Losing My Religion, Black’s Wonderful Life… more happy memories.

There was a sweatshirt in the show embroidered with a painting of flowers by the artist Francois Bard, whose pictures of boys in hoodies Van Assche also duplicated. Bard used some words in his original work, which the designer loosely translated as, “Time is only catching those who ignore it.” Van Assche has never been in any danger of that. He’s always been acutely aware of the passage of time, even more so this season as he celebrates his 10th year at Dior, which is also the house’s 70th anniversary.

The first half of the show was Van Assche’s reflection on what he considers to be the DNA of Dior menswear, a black suit and white shirt. His dissection was thorough, from an opening look where, for the first time, he offered a male take on the classic “veste de bar”, very tailored with a suppressed waist. Next, the jacket was sleeveless, paired with short shorts, gym shorts really, except they were in black ottoman wool. A little later, there was a tailcoat, Van Assche’s favourite piece in the collection, “because it was the most challenging.” It was cut on the bias, a break with tradition that gave the atelier’s tailors nightmares, according to the designer. Its formality was defused by being shown inside out and paired, again, with those shorts. And, again, it was also shown sleeveless. The orphaned sleeves were used in the collection as scarves or casually knotted round waists.

If that first half of the show was a celebration of his professional life — the address of the atelier was used as a decorative ribbon detail down a sleeve or writ small as a pinstripe — the second half was personal. “Late night summer, when we were kids staying out all night for the first time, drinking beers, falling in love…” Van Assche based these looks on school uniforms, with sweatshirts and bombers printed with a college-like logo, or those Bard images of hoodies.

He mentioned the “attitude of the street” often. Every model wore trainers. Some also wore necklaces that were supposed to look like they’d strung them themselves, from dice and skulls and shells. And there were so many more of the shorts that the teenage gam is incontrovertibly confirmed as the primary male erogenous zone of Spring 2018.

But (and there is always a “but” with KVA) something else Van Assche said illuminated why his signature hybrid of sport and tailoring will always err on the side of the latter, so that even the raging hormones of adolescence were subsumed here by adult abstemiousness. I asked about his own summer late nights, his own bittersweet memories of adolescent firsts. “I was way too good,” he answered ruefully. “That’s why I have to live it now.” So it’s all a fantasy. But, after a certain point, time will catch you, and it’s just too late.

SHOWstudio – 24 juin 2017

Lou Stoppard reports on the Comme des Garçons Homme Plus show

For seasons, we’ve all been complaining shows are mundane, repetitive, similar, safe. Kawakubo’s message, straight after opening her retrospective, is that she’s still setting the pace.
Comme des Garçons Made Me Hardcore. Rei Kawakubo has lots of reasons to celebrate – a stellar exhibition dedicated to her work opened recently at the Met’s Costume Institute in New York. It’s the second ever solo show to be dedicated to a living designer (the first was Yves Saint Laurent in 1983). Quite the achievement. So no wonder she was in the mood for a party.

Her past few collections have felt concerned, compassionate, reflective. Themes of war, displacement and masculinity have dominated her work. This was a more optimistic affair – what says optimism more than sparkle? Or disco lights? Or dancing? DJ extraordinaire Frédéric Sanchez set the mood and amped up the nostalgia by playing Supernature. Models danced with varying degrees of awkwardness. That added to the success of the show. The mood wasn’t mindless fun and happy hedonism. More that euphoric, urgent escapism of moving clumsily in a club – of whiling away hours on the dancing floor, bumping into fellow revellers, searching for meaning, looking for love. Models looked like boys at the end of the night, keen to find some vague purpose to keep them going for a few more hours.

Sounds fun? Yes, but there was depth too. The collection was dubbed What’s On The Inside Matters – strangely ironic, given that nights out are almost entirely about surface and luring others in with outfits, knowing glances and moves. The title was a reference to the clothes – jackets were almost entirely worn inside out. Only a Comme des Garçons jacket could be so beautiful that the internal panels, crafted often in florals or busy patterns, could look so at home on the outside. Three special styles were made in collaboration with Mona Luison, a textile sculptor whose work is childlike and warped, hence all those doll heads and terrifying baby faces. These pieces were the stuff of nightmares – a perfect version of a bad trip. For the finale, all the models reappeared on the square elevated platform that formed Kawakubo’s runway. They bopped mindlessly, bumping into each other, striking poses for the photographers. Close your eyes slightly and it looked like a scene from a Mark Leckey art film. As the last one left, and the music began to fade, the clapping began. It didn’t stop even after the lights went up and the sound finished. At most shows, just as the final model disappears from view, the front row leap to attention, rushing for the door. Here, we all stayed. Clapping. Smiling. Wishing for more. For seasons, we’ve all been complaining shows are mundane, repetitive, similar, safe. Kawakubo’s message, straight after opening her retrospective, is that she’s still setting the pace. After that, others need to work much harder.

Business Of Fashion – 24 juin 2017

Fierce Optimism at Comme Des Garçons Homme Plus

By Tim Blanks

Elevated catwalks are anathema to Rei Kawakubo, but the raised square that filled the centre of the Salle Wagram for Comme Des Garcons’ show on Friday afternoon looked a lot like a dancefloor in a nightclub. And sure enough, when Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack blared and the coloured spots started to spin and a passel of boys shuffled onto the floor, Comme54 sprang into awkward life.

Kawakubo gave Sanchez a one-word brief: DISCO! He mutated it a little: as much disco as a skewed spin on rave. The clothes followed suit: Madchester made even madder, like the models’ Liam Gallagher hairdos, exaggerated and drowned in sparkly gloop. Glitter cascaded over Comme signatures like the baggy shorts and the elongated, voluminous jackets.

Kawakubo’s message was this: What’s on the inside matters. All the jackets were turned inside out. So the incredible patchwork of sparkle, fake fur and animal print that we saw was actually a lining? You could scarcely picture a more vivid analogy for the crazy turmoil of anyone’s inner life at this particular moment in the decline and fall of western civilization. But it was so upbeat, sweet even. There were shirts and waistcoats that looked like they’d been composed of candy. And the stumbling self-consciousness of the models (who really wants to dance in front of an audience?) was a charming antidote to the otherwise-frostiness of this season’s runways. The takeaway was a fierce optimism. It’s not always been an attitude that easily attaches itself to Comme des Garcons (collaborator Mona

The takeaway was a fierce optimism. It’s not always been an attitude that easily attaches itself to Comme des Garcons (collaborator Mona Luison’s doll-parts jackets harked back to Kawakubo’s ability to effortlessly disconcert) , but in the wake of a major exhibition at New York’s Metropolitan Museum, the designer’s unique position in fashion has been brought to the fascinated attention of a much wider audience. You have to imagine that feels good. Well, something made her want to throw a party.

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Business Of Fashion – 18 juin 2017

A Graphic Pradaworld

In the face of so much conceptual complexity in her art world, Miuccia Prada opted for simplicity — the human touch — in her fashion world.

By Tim Blanks

Miuccia Prada hasn’t seen any of David Lynch’s new Twin Peaks. “I’m keeping it for the summer,” she said cheerily, “on the boat, when I’m bored.” It will be fascinating to hear her verdict, especially in light of the men’s show she presented on Sunday night, which she initially described as the result of her feeling “trapped between virtual reality and humanity.”

That seems to be more or less what is happening to everyone in Lynchland, with occasionally horrific results. No horror in Prada, of course, but the same effort to reconcile our primal human physicality (“Live real, love real, die real,” as Miuccia said) and the vast, unpredictable unknowability of almost everything else. Lynch advocates surrender to chaos, Prada is still bent on extracting some kind of order from it all.

That’s why she’d fallen in love with comics: their simple frame-by-frame logic, the humanity of the handmade. At the same time, Miuccia found their peculiar stop/start quality appealing. It’s a lot like life. “They’re the opposite of fake virtual reality, but at the same time they’re very fragmented.” In commissioning a couple of artists to create graphic analogies for her state of mind, she’d asked that they “do stories, push the human touch, not too superhero.”

The Prada showspace was lined with huge dislocated frames, alienation writ super-large. On Prada’s Instagram, the frames were allowed to form into short vignettes that offered a more cohesive glimpse of narrative possibility. Maybe that in itself was exactly the juxtaposition Miuccia was addressing. “You have to embrace the new world, but you don’t want to lose your essential humanity,” she mused. “Do you put them together, or keep them separate? The whole world is facing this challenge.”

Never mind that her challenge was to somehow convey all this in a collection of clothing. Truth be told, it was one of those seasons where the ebb and flow of the designer’s thought processes were more entrancing than the physical expression of those processes. Right now, the Fondazione Prada in Milan is showing a virtual reality piece by the director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu that is wringing tears from viewers. Meanwhile, the Fondazione Prada in Venice has a fourway between artist Thomas Demand, filmmaker Alexander Kluge, costume designer Anna Viebrock and curator Udo Kittelmann that is the most extraordinary, engulfing experience, literally stepping through a door (actually, there are many doors to choose from) into a parallel reality. (Lynch again!) So it was understandable that, in the face of so much conceptual complexity in her art world, Miuccia would opt for simplicity – the human touch – in her fashion world.

My takeaway from the show was a jumpsuit. “I’m crazy about jumpsuits,” Miuccia enthused. “I fell in love, no reason. Probably because it’s simple.” As well as which, it tied into the collection’s utilitarian subtext of functional human clothing (the apotheosis of the bumbag, right here, right now). Concerned that simplicity might be edging towards naivete, Miuccia weighted a number of looks with big heavy classic coats in flannel and herringbone. “The right counterpart,” she decided. “That’s just fashion.”

Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack switched between New Wave radio stations, and all at once, the boys on the runway were cool kids in the 80s, with their semi-Stray Cat dos, and their Joe Jackson shoes, collars turned up, pants hitched high. And those coats, borrowed from dad, or pinched from a second-hand shop. In its own perverse way, it was a vision of innocence, comic strip clarity in a world spinning out of control. We know what happens to innocents in Lynchland. Can they survive in Pradaworld?

Dior Homme x Sennheiser – Musique originale et sound design – Juin 2017







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Personal Abyss

System Magazine – 02 juin 2017

My studio is more than a place of experimentation. It’s an extension of my own mind.’

The work and inspirations of one of fashion’s go-to music men.

By Frédéric Sanchez

Music-producer, Frédéric Sanchez, can be considered more than that. Known for featuring complex loops in his compositions, and creating audio-visual “soundscapes” with original films, Sanchez is best described as a sound-artist. The latter title, “artist”, is often also assigned to those Sanchez has collaborated with for many years, producing music for the shows of designers Martin Margiela, Miuccia Prada, and Rei Kawakubo at Comme des Garçons.

Sanchez revisited his archive for System, reworking footage from his various projects for a film that showcases his body of work, and the space in which it was created: his studio. Read Sanchez on the significance of this space, in his own words, below.

“My studio has become more than a place of experimentation; it’s like an extension of my own mind. With the many connections that are made, and interrupted there, it’s a space that leads me down previously unknown paths. Those paths meander and merge, responding to one another before inspiring something different – a new image. I give this new image to the viewers, who can then perceive it with their own emotions and dream up their own interpretation.”

For more from Frédéric Sanchez, read his conversation with fellow music producer, Michel Gaubert, in System No. 9. Click to buy.

Credits: Roma by Federico Fellini (1972), The Last of England by Derek Jarman (1988), Martin Margiela at Café de la Gare, Station Saint-Martin (1992), Siouxsie and the Banshees, Martine Sitbon at Elysée Montmartre (2008), Evening of Light by François De Menil (1969), Barbara Sukowa, Francesco Vezzoli, Visage, Vivienne Westwood’s ‘Café Society’ (1994), Merce Cunningham, Michael Clarke, Brian Eno, Roxy Music, Virgin Prunes, Prada, Comme des Garçons at Elysée Montmartre, Patrice Chéreau’s Bayreuth, Dior Homme, Last Year in Marienbad by Alain Resnais (1861), And the Ship Sails On by Federico Fellini (1983).

Dior Homme Toyko 2017 – Composition originale





Prada Resort 2018 show video – Composition originale

Prada women’s fall winter 2017 2018 show video – Composition originale

Le Monde – 09 mai 2017

Prada et ses fantaisies sucrées

Robes aux nuances de bonbons, blousons de nylon soufflé, imprimés lapin, Prada a présenté à Milan une première collection croisière faussement légère.

Par Carine Bizet

Dimanche, pour son premier défilé croisière, Prada a accueilli ses invités au nouveau restaurant Marchesi, à l’étage de sa boutique historique de la galerie Vittorio Emanuele II, à Milan. En 2014, la griffe italienne avait acheté ce salon de thé emblématique, fondé en 1824. Quel rapport entre les gourmandises de Marchesi et le luxe Prada ? Ces gâteaux à l’épaisse enveloppe sucrée et pastel, mi-kitsch, mi-désuets, révèlent des couches subtiles aux textures surprenantes, et sont un peu les allégories hypercaloriques de la mode Prada.

De la douceur, la marque peut en avoir besoin : le groupe Prada (qui rassemble aussi Church’s et Jil Sander) annonçait pour 2016 une baisse de 9 % de son chiffre d’affaires. S’inviter parmi les maisons du luxe qui mettent en scène leurs collections croisière n’est pas une dépense supplémentaire inconsidérée. A l’heure où le marché est malmené et saturé, les marques sont priées de se distinguer. Et à ce jeu, Miuccia Prada ne craint personne : il existe bien une esthétique Prada, mieux, un point de vue sur le monde, fait de dissonances et de faux-semblants.

Une fois les sucreries pastel dégustées, le public grimpe deux étages pour se retrouver sous le dôme de verre et métal de la galerie Vittorio Emanuele, et assister au défilé lui-même. Miuccia Prada adore les rondeurs de l’endroit, où son partenaire de toujours, l’architecte Rem Koolhaas, a installé un décor de miroirs qui démultiplie l’espace et file la métaphore des faux-semblants et des rencontres inattendues, celle qui guide toute la collection. Robes en organza superposé aux nuances de bonbons pastel et chaussettes de sport portées avec des talons aux architectures art déco, blousons de nylon soufflé et jupe portefeuille fermée d’une plaque de gomme gravée, imprimés lapins très Lewis Carroll, grands manteaux décolletés aux tombés sensuels et austères à la fois, chemise translucide piquée de bijoux graphiques façon Chrysler Building, robes bustier en coton à poches zippées et basket techniques… le mélange est fluide et vertigineux.

« Les formes se métamorphosent du sport à l’élégance, résume la créatrice. L’aspect érotique est lié à une forme de censure : quand j’étais jeune, on pouvait se promener à moitié nue, mais aujourd’hui, parce qu’il faut respecter les cultures et les religions, ce n’est plus possible. » De ce mélange s’impose une féminité complexe, moderne et opiniâtre, comme son auteure. « Je déteste tout ce qui contraint la femme à adhérer à une version “officielle” du beau. Déjouer ce conformisme est mon obsession, je n’utilise ces stéréotypes qu’avec beaucoup d’ironie. » Féministe par nature et conviction, Miuccia Prada n’a pas besoin de tee-shirts à messages pour le dire. Et son message est ici d’autant plus convaincant qu’elle paraît avoir retrouvé une légèreté, un sens de la simplicité raffinée.
Il semblerait que l’exercice de la croisière, qui permet de s’extraire des Fashion Weeks où l’on n’a le temps de rien et où il faut en faire beaucoup pour retenir l’attention, autorise la créatrice à s’exprimer avec moins d’urgence et de tension. Et elle a aussi décidé de donner un nouveau souffle à son travail : « Je souhaite désormais me montrer plus réaliste et honnête, pas seulement faire ce que j’aime et ce que je pense avoir du sens mais ce qui est utile pour aujourd’hui. S’isoler dans un monde de sophistication ne permet pas de progresser. Vous pouvez être le plus grand génie du monde mais si personne ne vous écoute, cela ne sert à rien. Je veux continuer à me confronter à la banalité et à la vulgarité, mais sans être isolée. »

Miuccia Prada poursuit donc son chemin entourée d’une équipe fidèle qui connaît bien son monde, comme Rem Koolhaas et Frédéric Sanchez, qui met en son ses défilés et a composé cette fois une mosaïque subtile et bluffante (la musique électronique de Mirwais, la voix du mannequin des années 1970 Veruschka, des reprises de Tchaïkovski par Malcolm McLaren, etc.).

Et puis il y a le bel « appendice » de son univers : la fondation Prada où elle orchestre ses goûts personnels en matière d’art. La présentation de la croisière coïncide d’ailleurs avec le vernissage de la nouvelle exposition de Francesco Vezzoli, ami et collaborateur de longue date, une œuvre consacrée à la télévision italienne des années 1970. Dans une mise en scène pop et très « cronenbergienne » (période Vidéodrome), l’artiste revisite et confronte, grâce à des installations vidéo, de riches univers : la variété délirante et désinhibée qui glorifiait la Cicciolina (présente à la soirée) ou Grace Jones, mais aussi les journaux télévisés ensanglantés par les attentats de l’extrême gauche italienne. Là encore, il est question d’éclectisme, de confrontations de contraires pour exprimer une réalité complexe. Comme chez Prada.

Business Of Fashion – 09 mai 2017

At Prada Cruise, New Heights of Spiky Femininity

The collection was a fabulously feisty female manifesto to the world of old white men who go on grabbing at the headlines.

BY TIM BLANKS

MILAN, Italy — This resort season is air miles madness for the hardy few prepared to chase fashion shows across the globe. Miuccia Prada opted for intelligent restraint. She showed at home, in Milan, but her choice of venue was so extraordinary and the bolt-on – an evening at the Fondazione Prada with Francesco Vezzoli’s new show « TV70″ – so stimulating, that I doubt there was a soul who missed the experiential thrill of a far-off land.

Miuccia presented five floors above the original Prada shop in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, one of the world’s grandest – and oldest – malls (150 years-plus, if you’re counting). We looked out over the rusted industrial bones of the dome and the arcade, a vantage point so rare it was enough to make you feel like the Phantom alone in his opera house. And all that metallic, masculine grandiosity seemed to provoke Miuccia to new heights of spiky femininity. Pink and pastel, feathers and crystal, scalloped hems of lace on filmy lingerie, delicate layers of transparency…she’d expressed ambiguous feelings about these traditional tokens of seduction after her collection in February, but the world continues to change at warp speed, and the impulse to co-opt and subvert, always an impetus in Miuccia’s work, can only have grown stronger.

She said she’d been thinking about modernism before she decided to show in the Galleria, a building which was, in its day, the elegant apogee of modernist architecture. Once the venue was chosen, she set out to marry that modernist elegance to the spirit she isolated as its contemporary equivalent in fashion: the lean, active, body-conscious essence of sportswear. But we are talking about Prada here, so the marriage was consummated under a topsheet of tantalizing perversity. Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack used snippets from Francis Lai’s score for David Hamilton’s 1977 scandal-fest « Bilitis. » The soft-focus eroticism of that movie was reflected in a collection which luxuriated in a Lolita-like prettiness. Kate Moss in the first flush of her career came to mind: the feathered headbands, the pigtails, the provokingly sheer layers designed to exercise Prudence McPrude, the Mayoress of Prudie Town. Longtime Prada collaborator James Jean contributed an art nouveau graphic of frolicking bunnies.

It could have been cute, but Miuccia Prada doesn’t do cute. The kick in this collection was the sport. The first look – a black hoodie with Elizabethan sleeves over a sheer black skirt over a white slip and schoolgirl kneesocks with Chicklet and Concetta heels – was a virtual manifesto. Beauty with balls. And so it went on, a fabulously feisty female fuck-you to the world of old white men who go on grabbing at headlines with their self-aggrandising last gasps. There was a moment, not so long ago, when the Prada mojo went AWOL. On Sunday, that moment was a distant memory.

Salvatore Ferragamo women’s fall winter 2017 2018 show video – Composition originale