Frederic Sanchez

Shiatzy Chen women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Jil Sander women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

MSGM women’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Roberto Cavalli women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Prada women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Escada women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Sonia Rykiel L’Atelier – Juillet 2018 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

oct. 042018

Berluti. Composition originale.

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Prada Neon Dream – Composition originale et sound design.

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Industreality – Composition originale et sound design.

juil. 162018

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Observia – Composition originale et sound design.

Miu Miu croisière 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Pal Zileri spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

MSGM men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Roberto Cavalli men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Prada men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

juil. 122018

Prada resort 2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

L’encyclopédie Florale de la Mode selon Vogue. Composition originale.

Business Of Fashion – 2 juillet 2018

The Seductive Conviction of Sonia Rykiel

Julie de Libran celebrated the brand’s 50th anniversary by glossing its essence with something grander.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Every so often, God smiles on fashion. On Sunday morning, Julie de Libran showed her L’Atelier collection for Sonia Rykiel in the courtyard of the Ecole des Beaux Arts. The weather complied. Frederic Sanchez chose the Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning” for the soundtrack, and the song’s strange, stinging sweetness was so perfect in context that you could feel critical faculties dissolving in the heat.

Which ultimately was neither here nor there, because de Libran mounted a fabulous display of classic Rykielisms, ticking box after box: sailor stripes, bias-cut jersey, pea coat, trench, mutant tuxedo, slinky lingerie and, always, the signature louche knitwear that defined a few generations of free-thinking Left Bankers. When the Chambre Syndicale, the governing body of French fashion, invited de Libran to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Rykiel brand, she was at first a little intimidated. Then she realized that what she was being offered was time, a real luxury in fashion. So she took it. She called the result L’Atelier because it was, after all, the expertise of the design studio that helped her gloss the brand’s essence with something a little grander.

So that’s what happened. Sonia launched her business in May 1968. Paris was in an activist uproar, and she rode that wave. It’s the nature of historical cycles that last century’s radical becomes this century’s pillar of society, but de Libran managed to expertly embody Rykiel’s transition. The multicoloured knit that dissolved into a chaos of threads would be ’68. The hyper-restraint of a floor-length tuxedo dress with coq-trimmed sleeves could, for the enfeebled purposes of my then and now comparison, stand for the kind of look that might entrance a modern client. But there was so much more: the slouch of a sequined sweatshirt, the scaled-up man’s suit, the classic Sonia sweater given some added SHAZAM! And the clichéd couture closer, the wedding dress, shown as a corseted extravagance over jeans.

De Libran was supported by a wonderful model casting: Kirsten Owen, Malgosia Bela, Elise Crombez, Aymeline Valade. Faces! The seductive conviction of the whole presentation made you wish the designer could reinvent this situation for her tepid ready-to-wear shows.

Business Of Fashion – 1 juillet 2018

Playing with the Double Side at Miu Miu

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday and the mysterious night.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Miuccia Prada had a significant cross-generational selection of actresses in the cruise collection she showed for Miumiu on Saturday, from Uma Thurman and Gwendoline Christie to Rowan Blanchard and Sadie Sink.

Then there were the models-turned actresses, Naomi Campbell, Jamie King, Audrey Marnay. Their presence made it clear the presentation was a performance. As it has been for the other fashion houses who’ve made a palaver out of cruise, everything distilled down to experience! Miumiu aimed for something immersive.

The setting was the Hotel Regina, an Art Nouveau gem adjacent to the Louvre. The story was essentially everything that goes on in hotels. Late nights, long corridors, lust cut loose from home and hearth. Cast your mind back to the video for Madonna’s “Justify My Love”. Or even “Lost in Translation”, with Bill Murray crooning “More than This” in a jet-lagged karaoke fog (both tracks were on Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack of “hotel music”).

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, the way people often are in hotels, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday, the mysterious night. Day featured sporty short shorts and cableknit cardigans, but also a galumphy teenbeat acid-washed denim element that was disconcerting enough to make you wonder if its presence was purely to emphasise the slinky adulthood of the rest of the collection, where columns of duchesse satin and swathes of leopard-patterned lamé. Much of it trimmed with feathers or generously strewn with crystals, conjured up Hollywood visions of stars lounging seductively in boudoirs, or slinking down hallways for assignations in other rooms. One enraptured onlooker was drawn to comparisons with Fellini’s “Juliet of the Spirits” and its rococo sensuality.

At the same time Miuccia couldn’t help herself. She had to undercut the obvious. So there were naïve jacquards – pussycats and flowers — and denim wrapped in a sheer peignoir that injected an element of sour/sweet, and a haunting undertow of « Rosemary’s Baby » in a model with Mia Farrow’s pixie cut from that film. (Or maybe it was Roman Polanski’s presence in the audience that sparked that association.)

Miuccia felt the duality was intrinsic. “In my life, I like to play with the double side,” she admitted. If, in the provocative anonymity of a huge old hotel, at least one facet of her split personality took on a racy life all its own, there was also the other grounded side of her personality to pose critical questions like What’s it all about? and Are we really having fun?