Frederic Sanchez

Roberto Cavalli women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Prada women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Escada women’s spring 2019 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

Sonia Rykiel L’Atelier – Juillet 2018 – Composition originale pour la vidéo.

oct. 042018

Berluti. Composition originale.

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Prada Neon Dream – Composition originale et sound design.

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Industreality – Composition originale et sound design.

juil. 162018

365, Prada Fall/Winter 2018 Advertising Campaign – Observia – Composition originale et sound design.

Miu Miu croisière 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Pal Zileri spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

MSGM men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Roberto Cavalli men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

Prada men’s spring summer 2019 – Composition originale pour la video.

juil. 122018

Prada resort 2019 fashion show – Composition originale pour la video.

L’encyclopédie Florale de la Mode selon Vogue. Composition originale.

Business Of Fashion – 2 juillet 2018

The Seductive Conviction of Sonia Rykiel

Julie de Libran celebrated the brand’s 50th anniversary by glossing its essence with something grander.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Every so often, God smiles on fashion. On Sunday morning, Julie de Libran showed her L’Atelier collection for Sonia Rykiel in the courtyard of the Ecole des Beaux Arts. The weather complied. Frederic Sanchez chose the Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning” for the soundtrack, and the song’s strange, stinging sweetness was so perfect in context that you could feel critical faculties dissolving in the heat.

Which ultimately was neither here nor there, because de Libran mounted a fabulous display of classic Rykielisms, ticking box after box: sailor stripes, bias-cut jersey, pea coat, trench, mutant tuxedo, slinky lingerie and, always, the signature louche knitwear that defined a few generations of free-thinking Left Bankers. When the Chambre Syndicale, the governing body of French fashion, invited de Libran to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Rykiel brand, she was at first a little intimidated. Then she realized that what she was being offered was time, a real luxury in fashion. So she took it. She called the result L’Atelier because it was, after all, the expertise of the design studio that helped her gloss the brand’s essence with something a little grander.

So that’s what happened. Sonia launched her business in May 1968. Paris was in an activist uproar, and she rode that wave. It’s the nature of historical cycles that last century’s radical becomes this century’s pillar of society, but de Libran managed to expertly embody Rykiel’s transition. The multicoloured knit that dissolved into a chaos of threads would be ’68. The hyper-restraint of a floor-length tuxedo dress with coq-trimmed sleeves could, for the enfeebled purposes of my then and now comparison, stand for the kind of look that might entrance a modern client. But there was so much more: the slouch of a sequined sweatshirt, the scaled-up man’s suit, the classic Sonia sweater given some added SHAZAM! And the clichéd couture closer, the wedding dress, shown as a corseted extravagance over jeans.

De Libran was supported by a wonderful model casting: Kirsten Owen, Malgosia Bela, Elise Crombez, Aymeline Valade. Faces! The seductive conviction of the whole presentation made you wish the designer could reinvent this situation for her tepid ready-to-wear shows.

Business Of Fashion – 1 juillet 2018

Playing with the Double Side at Miu Miu

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday and the mysterious night.

BY TIM BLANKS

PARIS, France — Miuccia Prada had a significant cross-generational selection of actresses in the cruise collection she showed for Miumiu on Saturday, from Uma Thurman and Gwendoline Christie to Rowan Blanchard and Sadie Sink.

Then there were the models-turned actresses, Naomi Campbell, Jamie King, Audrey Marnay. Their presence made it clear the presentation was a performance. As it has been for the other fashion houses who’ve made a palaver out of cruise, everything distilled down to experience! Miumiu aimed for something immersive.

The setting was the Hotel Regina, an Art Nouveau gem adjacent to the Louvre. The story was essentially everything that goes on in hotels. Late nights, long corridors, lust cut loose from home and hearth. Cast your mind back to the video for Madonna’s “Justify My Love”. Or even “Lost in Translation”, with Bill Murray crooning “More than This” in a jet-lagged karaoke fog (both tracks were on Frederic Sanchez’s soundtrack of “hotel music”).

Miuccia translated the rootless intrigue of travellers adrift, the way people often are in hotels, into a collection that had two faces, the everyday, the mysterious night. Day featured sporty short shorts and cableknit cardigans, but also a galumphy teenbeat acid-washed denim element that was disconcerting enough to make you wonder if its presence was purely to emphasise the slinky adulthood of the rest of the collection, where columns of duchesse satin and swathes of leopard-patterned lamé. Much of it trimmed with feathers or generously strewn with crystals, conjured up Hollywood visions of stars lounging seductively in boudoirs, or slinking down hallways for assignations in other rooms. One enraptured onlooker was drawn to comparisons with Fellini’s “Juliet of the Spirits” and its rococo sensuality.

At the same time Miuccia couldn’t help herself. She had to undercut the obvious. So there were naïve jacquards – pussycats and flowers — and denim wrapped in a sheer peignoir that injected an element of sour/sweet, and a haunting undertow of « Rosemary’s Baby » in a model with Mia Farrow’s pixie cut from that film. (Or maybe it was Roman Polanski’s presence in the audience that sparked that association.)

Miuccia felt the duality was intrinsic. “In my life, I like to play with the double side,” she admitted. If, in the provocative anonymity of a huge old hotel, at least one facet of her split personality took on a racy life all its own, there was also the other grounded side of her personality to pose critical questions like What’s it all about? and Are we really having fun?

Fashion Network – 22 juin 2018

Ann Demeulemeester’s symbolist romance

By Godfrey Deeny

Nothing very gender specific in a notably romantic co-ed show by the house of Ann Demeulemeester, an nostalgic collection that captured the contemporary yearning for a little more poetry in our lives.

The clothes were almost interchangeable between the guys and the gals in this collection, very much in keeping with the poetic rocker DNA of this Belgian house.

The gents appeared in lace shirts and gloves; cut-off petticoats; ladylike woven leather sandals; girly white cotton blouses and bloomers; the ladies wearing similar gear. Half the cast sported battered leather and straw hats worthy of a peasant in a Van Gogh oil painting. Above all, some superbly cut linen planters coats and dusters in dusty pink jacquards and ecru. Plenty of good merchandise in other words; and all inspired by the late 19th century symbolist painter Odilon Redon, whose paintings phantasmagorical dream-like qualities were echoed in the clothes.

“Odilon came from moment a when people were beginning to doubt the need for constant progress. When people wanted to pause and dream more. That’s what I wanted to suggest,” said the house’s creative director Sébastien Meunier, who took over the design helm after founder Ann retired in 2013.

That need for dreams also apparent in an inspired soundtrack by Frederic Sanchez: four versions by, respectively, Marianne Faithful, Loreena McKennitt, Elizabeth Fraser and Joan Baez, of that great Irish romantic lament, She Moved Through the Fair. A moment of grace among an intensely busy day of traffic jams, multiple events and parties.

Fashion Network – 17 juin 2018

Prada ou la nouvelle élégance décontractée

Par Godfrey Deeny  –  17 juin 2018

A la manière des équipes qui se révèlent toujours brillantes en compétition, Miuccia Prada est de la trempe des créateurs compétiteurs, ces designers qui sortent les meilleures idées à chaque saison, qui savent avec précision à quel moment changer de direction ou quand un concept artistique ou stratégique a fait son temps.

Au moment précis où tout le monde à Milan se résigne à suivre le courant en injectant des coupes, des finitions et des matériaux inspirés du sportswear tout en les associant avec des motifs et couleurs tirés de l’univers du skateboard, Miuccia Prada met le holà. Et décide, pour le printemps-été 2019, de présenter une silhouette décontractée, vaguement technique, à la coupe impeccable – une allure qui allait très, très bien à ses mannequins particulièrement juvéniles et ébouriffés.
  
« Je déteste le fait que les Millennials soient réduits à une simple catégorie marketing. Ils sont notre jeunesse, la prochaine génération. Les voir comme une proposition commerciale, c’est stupide », explique la créatrice italienne devant un buffet parsemé de vodka-citron et de sandwiches aux anchois juste après le défilé.

Des pantalons à la coupe élancée, sans pinces ; des manteaux et des blazers minimalistes, en veau velours, et du denim légèrement délavé du meilleur effet – d’ailleurs, notez-le bien : le denim clair, utilisé sur des pièces tailleur, est à nouveau officiellement autorisé. Également très réussie, une série de sneakers en toile élastique. Rien de trop appuyé : branché et actuel, mais mûrement réfléchi. La plupart des mannequins portaient des chapkas en nylon matelassé, tantôt couleur tabac, noir, rose, puis imprimé d’incroyables motifs.
 
« Je suis à la recherche d’une nouvelle élégance. Je la ressens chez la nouvelle génération. Les jeunes en ont assez du street style, des logos et du skateboard. Ce sont leurs parents qui ont lancé cette tendance ! » rappelle Miuccia Prada.

Elle n’a pas oublié d’ajouter un soupçon psychédélique : des mélanges de motifs surréalistes, avec des visages de jeunes filles sensuelles aux lèvres écarlates ; des parterres entiers de fleurs ; des cimes de montagnes acidulées et des gratte-ciel au parfum vintage. Ambiance Jimi Hendrix du 21e siècle, des tenues parfaites pour aller faire la fête.
 
Cette saison, Miuccia Prada a renoué avec la tradition, en présentant son défilé à la Fondazione Prada. Et, avec son équipe de compétition, elle a créé un nouveau décor magnifique : de confortables sièges gonflables en plastique transparent réalisés à partir d’un design original de Verner Panton qui n’avait jamais vu le jour.

Au rythme d’une bande-son géniale assemblée par Frédéric Sanchez, qui s’ouvrait sur le titre « Windowlicker » d’Aphex Twin, les mannequins jeunes, frais et plein d’assurance, défilaient dans une ambiance calme et mise en scène avec intelligence.

Bizarrement, au même moment, la meilleure équipe de tournoi du monde – l’Allemagne – a perdu son premier match à la Coupe du monde, face au Mexique… Personne n’est parfait.
Par Godfrey Deeny
Traduit par Paul Kaplan

juin 192018

Vogue – 17 juin 2018

by LUKE LEITCH

A Prada show sometimes feels like an especially fiendish crossword puzzle that’s designed never to be solved. To get to something even approaching a suitable answer you need to navigate a whole tranche of clues, misdirections, and visual entendres.

But that’s the game. The unknowability of Prada is one of the elements that so entrances its devotees. As Timothy Leary once said, “The universe is an intelligence test.” In Miuccia Prada’s universe, the test is to find the intelligence—the information—that leads you to a vaguely acceptable explanation.

Tonight the trail of clues began with the setup. Prada’s double-vaulted industrial shell was stripped back and redolent with the fresh-rubber smell of a newly bought pool toy, thanks to the translucent sheeting that coated its walls and floor. The seating was reproductions of the inflatable footstool first produced in 1960 by Danish designer Verner Panton, whose “total environment” interiors look like Austin Powers sets today, but were in their time powerfully psychedelic spaces.

This nod to the 1960s (sex, drugs, rock ’n’ roll!) prefaced the most urgent-to-the-eye decorations in this show: the powerfully ’60s florals near the end, the hand-drawn head-scape of flowers, clouds, and girls on a sweater towards the beginning, and the three printed and filtered collage looks—with short-shorts—in the middle. The music was Aphex Twin and Brian Eno, culminating with Air’s “Sexy Boy.” Okay . . . so was this Prada taking a trip to Sexytown? Backstage Mrs. Prada said she was hoping this season’s iteration of Prada man would be “elegant but in a young, new way.” Almost coyly, she did not disagree with the suggestion that sexiness was on the Prada palette. “You know I’m a bit contrarian. You know I never pronounce this word in my life: I never wanted to pronounce the word sexy. But now, sexy. . . .”

Aha! Maybe that was it! Prada loves to play with the ugly, and today—as Versace touched on, too—sexy is an ugly notion. Which makes it ripe for Prada-fication. So was Prada dosing us, taking us on a trip and urging us to turn on, tune in, drop out, and assess the subject afresh?

Sexiness is subjective, of course, but there was a trad-masculine authority (if that’s what you’re into) in the cleanly cut single-vented colored blazers and seamed, washed jeans with a break. There was also plenty of thigh (if that’s what you’re into) in the Daisy Duke denims (Davey Dukes?) and printed, striped, or plain short shorts which Prada might just have described as “miniskirts for men” (it was hard to hear in the backstage crush). There was a touch of femme (if that’s what you’re into) in the rubber-sheened ruffle-fronted shirts that were delivered towards the end.

There was a gentle return to the logo-fication we’ve seen here in recent seasons, but with none of the heavy emphasis on sportswear. Instead there were sturdily unreconstructed rib-knit and leather half-zips, boat shoes, ushankas in house nylon or a weave in red and blue that translated to sneakers and a sweater, and a tailored silhouette that was ostentatiously un-emphasized. Every look—every single one of them—came with a bag slung across the right shoulder.

Prada collections are drawn-out acts of fashion titillation, obfuscation, and veiled intent. As propositions go, tonight’s was almost bracingly direct: sexy boys in elusive clothes. And, like, wearable.